Villages around Ashbourne

Blore

Slideshow

Blore is a secluded village just south of Ilam and the entrance to Dovedale, with a fine hall and a beautiful old church. The church was founded in the early 12th century and much of it dates from about then, though with many later additions. It is notable for not having been restored by the usual over-zealous Victorians. The result is that the church is almost as it was when the last additions were made in the early 17th century - an absolute gem.

Blore Church
Blore Church
The village was the home of the Bassett family from the mid 15th century until 1652 when the family line died out. They were responsible for the hall and much of the church and its contents. The chief glory of the church is the magnificent alabaster tomb of William Bassett V (d 1601), the last of the male line. The carvings on the tomb depict him in the centre with his wife Judith on his left and his son-in-law Henry Howard on his right. At the head of Henry is his wife, Elizabeth Bassett, and at the head of Judith is her grand-daughter, Elizabeth Howard. The family are buried in a vault beneath the tomb, though unfortunately this was robbed in the early 19th century and the lead coffins stolen, so the vault is now sealed.

This is not the only interesting monument in the church - beneath the North Aisle is a 15th century brass commemorating William Bassett II and his wife Joan, and there is some notable old stained glass.

The situation of Blore, overlooking the lower end of the Manifold and facing the end of Dovedale, is very pretty and at Blore Pastures on the road between Ilam and Blore there is a car park which has a particularly beautiful view of the area and is well worth visiting.
 

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Blore Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Ilam Church
0 - Ilam Church
Ilam Church - the Saxon font
1 - Ilam Church - the Saxon font
Ilam Church - Pike Watts tomb
2 - Ilam Church - Pike Watts tomb
Ilam Hall - Saxon cross
3 - Ilam Hall - Saxon cross
Ilam Hall
4 - Ilam Hall
Blore Church
5 - Blore Church
Dovedale view from Blore Pastures
6 - Dovedale view from Blore Pastures
Ilam - the cross
7 - Ilam - the cross
Ilam - houses
8 - Ilam - houses
Blore Church - Bassett tomb
9 - Blore Church - Bassett tomb
Ilam - St Bertrand's Bridge
10 - Ilam - St Bertrand's Bridge
Ilam Church - Tomb of St Bertram
11 - Ilam Church - Tomb of St Bertram
Ilam Hall
12 - Ilam Hall
Ilam Cross
13 - Ilam Cross

No local visits found

Fenny Bentley

Slideshow

Fenny Bentley is likely to be the first village the visitor encounters on entering the Peak from the South. To the tourist passing through its main feature appears to be the steep hill which exits the village and carries the A515 road up into the Peak District, crossed half-way up by the bridge of former Buxton-Ashbourne railway, now the Tissington Trail.

Cherry Orchard farm
Cherry Orchard farm
The centre of the village is off the main road and contains a nice church, much restored in the 19th century, whose main interest is the tomb of Thomas Beresford (d 1473), a veteran of Agincourt, and his wife. The tomb was built 100 years after Beresford's death and has unusual shrouded effigies of him and his wife, with the shrouded figures of their 21(!) children on the side of the tomb.

Across the road from the church is another remnant of Thomas Beresford - the fortified manor house which he built for himself and which still stands. Known as Cherry Orchard Farm, the house has a fortified square tower which is unique in the Peak. It is still a working farm.
 
Fenny Bentley Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Fenny Bentley - Cherry Orchard farm
0 - Fenny Bentley - Cherry Orchard farm
Fenny Bentley Church - Beresford tomb
1 - Fenny Bentley Church - Beresford tomb
Tissington Hall
2 - Tissington Hall
Tissington Cottages
3 - Tissington Cottages
Tissington Cottage
4 - Tissington Cottage
Tissington Church
5 - Tissington Church
Tissington Church - Norman font
6 - Tissington Church - Norman font
Tissington Church - Fitzherbert memorial
7 - Tissington Church - Fitzherbert memorial
Tissington duckpond
8 - Tissington duckpond
Tissington Well Dressing
9 - Tissington Well Dressing

No local visits found

Kniveton

Slideshow

Kniveton is a pretty and quite ancient village which lies on the road between Ashbourne and Wirksworthin the southern area of the White Peak. The village has the same name as the original lords of the manor, whose coat of arms may be seen in ancient stained glass in the 13th century church.

Kniveton Church
Kniveton Church
The church is very well preserved and has been little altered from medieval times.

The village has many fine old houses and pretty cottages, especially off the main road. There is also a pub but few other amenities.
 
Kniveton Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Kniveton church interior
0 - Kniveton church interior
Kniveton cottage
1 - Kniveton cottage

No local visits found

Mayfield

Mayfield is a large, sprawling village on the Staffordshire side of the River Dove, close to Ashbourne. Upper Mayfield has some lovely 17th and 18th century houses. Lower Mayfield, down by the river and the oldest part of the village, has the church and an old yarn mill. The main part of the modern village is situated between Upper and Lower Mayfield.

It is an old village with a lovely church and since the end of the 18th century it has mostly made a living through the cotton mills situated along the River Dove. One is still active - a rarity nowadays.

Another point of interest is that Mayfield was the home of the Irish poet Thomas Moore - a close friend of the poet Byron, who visited regularly. One of Byron's young daughters is buried in the churchyard as she died while on a visit here.

Mayfield has a well-dressing in mid-June and is one of the few places outside Derbyshire to hold one.
 

No local visits found

Thorpe

Slideshow

Thorpe is strategically situated at the end of Dovedale and is therefore a busy place on summer weekends. However, the main part of the village lies in a cul-de-sac off the through road and is a surprisingly peaceful spot. At the end of this cul-de-sac a track leads down to Coldwall Bridge across the River Dove south of the present access to Dove Dale - this is the old route south from here.

Thorpe Church
Thorpe Church
The village is one of the few in the Peak with a name which clearly betrays Norse origins, for the Danish settlers did not generally penetrate far into this area. The village was mentioned in Domesday, as was nearby Broadlow Ash Farm. Other historical connections of the area include the local farms of Newton Grange, which was a farming settlement belonging to Combermere Abbey of Cheshire, and Hanson Grange which belonged to Burton-on-Trent monastery.

The village clusters around a beautiful little church with a Norman tower, built about 1100 AD, and with suggestions of Saxon work here and there. The nave was added in the 14th century, possibly replacing a Saxon construction, and a vestry in the 19th century. There is a fine tomb of the Millward family (1632) by the altar.

The road down to Dovedale first passes the three star hotel, Peveril of the Peak, and then the distinctive cone of Thorpe Cloud, the hill which guards the entrance to Dovedale. (Cloud is a corruption of the Old English word 'clud', meaning hill.) The summit is a short but stiff climb from any direction, though the approach from Thorpe village is probably easier than that from Dovedale, and certainly involves less gain in height. Whichever way you ascend it the climb is well worthwhile, for the panoramic view is really splendid, including Dovedale all the way to Alstonefield as well as Ilam and lower Manifold valley.
 
Thorpe Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Dovedale from below Thorpe Cloud
0 - Dovedale from below Thorpe Cloud
Dovedale - The Stepping Stones
1 - Dovedale - The Stepping Stones
Dovedale - The Stepping Stones on a busy day
2 - Dovedale - The Stepping Stones on a busy day
Dovedale - The Twelve Apostles
3 - Dovedale - The Twelve Apostles
Thorpe Cloud from the river Dove
4 - Thorpe Cloud from the river Dove
Thorpe Cloud - The view up Dovedale
5 - Thorpe Cloud - The view up Dovedale
Thorpe Cloud - Descending towards Lindale
6 - Thorpe Cloud - Descending towards Lindale
Dovedale - Tissington Spires
7 - Dovedale - Tissington Spires
Blore Church
8 - Blore Church
Ilam - the cross
9 - Ilam - the cross
Ilam - houses
10 - Ilam - houses
Thorpe church
11 - Thorpe church
Blore Church - Bassett tomb
12 - Blore Church - Bassett tomb

No local visits found

Tissington

Slideshow

Tissington is one of the prettiest villages in this area of the Peak and is also a convenient point of access to the Tissington Trail. It is therefore a popular place on a summer weekend.

Tissington
Tissington
The village lies just off the main Buxton-Ashbourne road and has been since the 1460s the estate village of the FitzHerbert family, whose hall, erected in 1609, stands in the centre of the village. The village is delightfully laid out with plenty of space and buildings which were mostly erected in the early 19th century. It has an imposing southern approach via a grand gateway and an avenue of lime trees while the access to the east necessitates negotiating a ford in the Bradbourne, a very popular spot with local kids on hot summer days who will gladly offer to wash any cars that pass through, irrespective of whether the drivers window is closed or otherwise!.

The village church sits on a mound almost opposite the hall and has a Norman doorway and font, but was heavily restored in Victorian times. However it contains the monumental 17th century memorial to Francis and Thomas FitzHerbert, which is well worth a look.

Tissington Hall
Tissington Hall
The village is largely arranged along a single street, with the old school at the southern end and the hall and church halfway up. Just to the east of the old school there is a picturesque village pond and a road leading onwards to the former railway station, now a car park for the Tissington Trail.

The village has no less than five wells and is now mainly notable for its well-dressing, which takes place each year on Ascension Day, making it the first Peak District well dressing of the year, and usually one of the best.

The fields along the A515 road outside the village are significant for their clear remains of the old medieval strip field system.
 
Tissington Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Fenny Bentley - Cherry Orchard farm
0 - Fenny Bentley - Cherry Orchard farm
Fenny Bentley Church - Beresford tomb
1 - Fenny Bentley Church - Beresford tomb
Parwich house
2 - Parwich house
Parwich house
3 - Parwich house
Parwich duckpond
4 - Parwich duckpond
Parwich public house
5 - Parwich public house
Parwich house
6 - Parwich house
Tissington Hall
7 - Tissington Hall
Tissington Cottages
8 - Tissington Cottages
Tissington Cottage
9 - Tissington Cottage
Tissington Church
10 - Tissington Church
Tissington Church - Norman font
11 - Tissington Church - Norman font
Tissington Church - Fitzherbert memorial
12 - Tissington Church - Fitzherbert memorial
Tissington duckpond
13 - Tissington duckpond
Tissington Well Dressing
14 - Tissington Well Dressing

No local visits found

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