Villages around Hathersage

Abney

Slideshow

A view of a farm near Abney
A view of a farm near Abney
Abney is a tiny hamlet of a few farms lying in a remote valley high up above the Derwent to the south of Hope Valley. It is beautifully situated and the area around is excellent for walking, with Shatton Edge, Bretton Clough and Eyam Moor all nearby. The settlement was mentioned as 'Habenai' in the Domesday book, so it is very ancient and probably hasn't got much bigger since those times.

On the road down to Hathersage lies Highlow Hall, an Elizabethan manor house and the seat of one of the branches of the Eyre family. A Robert Eyre of Highlow was High Sheriff of Derbyshire at one time. The building is quite distinctive and is reputedly one of the most haunted buildings in Derbyshire, with at least four ghosts.

To the west, on Hucklow Edge, there is the headquarters of the Derbyshire and Lancashire Gliding Club and at weekends gliders are often in the sky above.
 

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Abney Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
0 - Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
1 - Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
Eyam Moor barrow and view to Hathersage
2 - Eyam Moor barrow and view to Hathersage

No local visits found

Bamford

Slideshow

Bamford is a former mill-village and occupies the hillside underneath Bamford Edge and above the River Derwent. There is a lot more to the village than can be seen when just passing through. It has some lovely quiet corners and the Derwent is especially pretty around the millpool just above the mill itself. The impressive wier can be admired from the footbridge below the mill that carries the Public Footpath across to the south bank. There is a well-dressing festival here in mid-July.

The mill is the first of many on the course of the Derwent and was built around 1780, burnt down and rebuilt in 1791-2. It was a cotton mill but closed for this purpose in 1965 and was used by an electric furnace manufacturer until the 1990s. It has now been converted into apartments.

Ladybower
Ladybower
The modern village is mainly strung out along the road which leads from the A625 up towards Ladybower Reservoir, about 3km away. At the bottom end there is the railway station, which very conveniently links Bamford with both Manchester and Sheffield. On the road just below the station the Peak Park have re-erected the Mytham Bridge toll gate which used to stand nearby. This was one of the toll gates on the first turnpike in the area - built in 1758 to link Sheffield to Sparrowpit. Higher up, at the centre of the village there are some shops and two pubs.

Nearer to Ladybower there is the settlement of Yorkshire Bridge, with a pub of the same name. This settlement was built to rehouse some of the people who were displaced when Ladybower dam was constructed in the 1940s.

Bamford Edge is a fine gritstone edge which overlooks the village and offers a fine view of Ladybower. The edge is private land and was not readily accessible to walkers until the 'Right to Roam' legislation came into effect. This means it is considerably less well tramped or eroded than other edges. The view from the edge is very worthwhile.

Below Bamford, across the Derwent lies the hamlet of Shatton. This straggles up a lane south of the River Noe leading up onto Shatton Edge. At the end of the lane lies Shatton Hall and Nether House, one of the houses Robert Eyre of Highlow built for his seven sons in Elizabethan times. Shatton Edge, high above the hamlet, offers fine views over the Hope Valley and good walking country.
 
Bamford Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Ladybower - View to Crook Hill
0 - Ladybower - View to Crook Hill
Ladybower from Win Hill
1 - Ladybower from Win Hill
Win Hill summit
2 - Win Hill summit
Bamford Edge view of Ladybower
3 - Bamford Edge view of Ladybower

No local visits found

Bradwell

Slideshow

Bradwell (or Bradda as it is known locally) owns something of a distinction. A sprawling but interesting collection of old cottages, the village actually retains a significant amount of local industry and is not dependant on tourism. Engineering, quarrying and ice cream-making are all important here but have surprisingly limited impact on the appeal of the settlement they serve.

A view of Hope cement works
A view of Hope cement works
Like many other villages of the area, Bradwell was once an important centre for lead-mining (the 'Bradda Beaver' hat was universally worn in the lead mines in the 19th century) and the moor above the village is scarred by the remains of many mines, some of which are now being worked for Fluorspar.

The discreet charms of Bradwell are fairly well hidden from the average passer-by, for the main part of the village clings to a steep hillside above the main road and can hardly be seen. The centre of the village, which lies above the brook just south of the main road, is a rabbit-warren of tiny cottages and narrow lanes with picturesque names like Soft Water Lane, Hungry Lane and Hollowgate. From here the houses spread right up the hillside, from where there are fine views across the Hope Valley.

Bradwell
Bradwell
Though most of the village dates from the lead-mining era, Bradwell has a long history - the narrow street called Smalldale follows the line of the Roman road between Brough and Buxton. A Saxon earthwork called the Grey Ditch runs from Bradwell Edge to Micklow Hill near the New Bath Hotel, where there is a thermal spring and the remains of a Roman Bath were found.

On the road to Tideswell up Bradwell Dale lies Hazelbadge Hall, one of the oldest houses in the area, which was built in 1549 and still has the arms of the Vernon family on its wall. Bradwell is also noted as the home of Samuel Fox, the inventor of the modern umbrella mechanism. His house is marked with a plaque and lies just off the main street.

Also of interest is the home of Bradwell's Home-made Dairy Ice Cream, in the centre of the village, and Bagshawe Cavern, (open to visitors & adventure caving groups) up the hill to the South.

Brough is a nearby small hamlet on the banks of the River Noe, important in Roman times as the site of the Anavio fort, an important factor in the Roman occupation of the Peak District. Here Batham Gate, the Roman road from Buxton, met the roads from Melandra (near Glossop) and that which came from Sheffield and Doncaster via Stanage edge. On the mound behind the modern hamlet the Romans built a wooden stockade about AD70 and this was replaced by a stone one around AD150. Altars and a commemorative stone from the fort are in the Buxton museum. After about AD200 the fort was only intermittently garrisoned but a settlement grew up around this important road junction.
 
Bradwell Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
0 - Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
Bradwell welldressing
1 - Bradwell welldressing
Bradwell village
2 - Bradwell village
Cement Works, Hope Valley
3 - Cement Works, Hope Valley
Hope Church
4 - Hope Church
Castleton view with Mam Tor behind
5 - Castleton view with Mam Tor behind
Hope Churchyard - Saxon cross
6 - Hope Churchyard - Saxon cross
Bradwell - White Hart Inn
7 - Bradwell - White Hart Inn

No local visits found

Bretton

Slideshow

The Barrel Inn
The Barrel Inn
Bretton is a quiet hamlet high up on a gritstone ridge which rears up steeply above the limestone plateau below. The view from here is splendid - it is said that on a clear day you can see for 30 miles.

The original turnpike road from Sheffield and Grindleford to Buxton went along this ridge, and an ancient packhorse way from Eyam to Hathersage passed nearby, so it is no surprise that the pub, the Barrel, is dated 1597.

There is a Youth Hostel nearby and the fascinating Bretton Clough and all the great walking it offers is a just over the back of the settlement. Nearby is the radio-masted summit of William Hill, which offers superb 360 degree views of this area of the Peak District.
 
Bretton Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bretton - the Barrel Inn
0 - Bretton - the Barrel Inn
Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
1 - Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
Eyam - brass band in welldressing parade
2 - Eyam - brass band in welldressing parade
Eyam Hall
3 - Eyam Hall
Foolow village green
4 - Foolow village green
Foolow - Waterfall swallet
5 - Foolow - Waterfall swallet

No local visits found

Eyam

Slideshow

Eyam is one of the best-preserved villages in the vicinity and is the famous 'plague village', which went into voluntary quarantine when the plague was imported from London in 1665. Above the village lies Eyam Moor which is a fine area for walking, with good views across the Derwent valley and many Bronze Age remains and monuments.

Eyam Church
Eyam Church
The church in the centre of the village has many relics of the Plague, including Mompesson's chair, gravestones of Plague victims and the Parish Register recording the deaths. Within the church there is a small exhibition about the Plague. The church has two Norman columns, and may be built on Saxon foundations, but dates mostly from the 13th and 14th centuries. In the churchyard there is a magnificent Saxon cross dating probably from the 9th century and carved with a mixture of pagan and Christian symbols. There is also a fine sundial on the wall of the church.

The Rectory next door to the church was the birthplace in 1747 of Anna Seward, the 'Swan of Lichfield', a noted literary character of the 18th Century who wrote poetry in the 'Augustan' style, which is now thoroughly out of fashion. Amongst many other works, she wrote a touching poem 'Eyam' which was about the village, and she was a friend of Sir Walter Scott amongst others.

Eyam Hall
Eyam Hall
There are many fine old houses in Eyam and parts of the village have been kept as they looked several centuries ago, especially the area at Townend, around the Miner's Arms. Many of the buildings also have plaques giving details of their history and the part their inhabitants played in the Plague saga, notably the Plague Cottages, where the outbreak began, which are on the main street on the west side of the church.

Also on the main street lies Eyam Hall, built in 1676 but in a style which was already out of fashion, so it looks like an early Jacobean mansion. It is the home of the Wright family who built it and have lived there ever since, and the house is open to visitors in the summer months, as well as housing a small craft centre.

Waterfall Swallett
Waterfall Swallett
The local industries were lead-mining (the lead-miners were noted Non-Conformists and Wesley preached here), silk weaving and shoe-making. The discovery of the Hucklow Side Vein in 1777 led to a boom in lead mining in this area for the next hundred years and next to the village school is a mound which still houses the shaft of Glebe Mine, a lead mine which was later worked for fluorspar until 1965. At the West end of the village is Townhead factory, built as a silk mill, and there is a former shoe factory in the centre of the village. Eyam had one of the earliest public water supplies of anywhere in the area (1588) and parts of this system can still be seen around the village.

To the West of the village, off the road to Foolow, lies Little and Greater Waterfall Swallet, good examples of natural potholes. The water which disappears into these swallets reappears near Stoney Middleton.

Eyam has several shops and tea rooms, plus one pub, the Miner's Arms. This is dated 1630 and is the former meeting place of the Barmote Court, which dealt with lead mining disputes. It is also is reputed to be one of the most haunted buildings in Derbyshire, which would surely add interest to a night's stay! Just outside the village is a public carpark and toilets with a small museum opposite. On the edge above the village there is a Youth Hostel.

Eyam has a well-dressing in late August.
 
Eyam Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Eyam Plague Cottages
0 - Eyam Plague Cottages
Eyam Churchyard
1 - Eyam Churchyard
Eyam cottages with plague signpost
2 - Eyam cottages with plague signpost
Eyam churchyard - Plague gravestone
3 - Eyam churchyard - Plague gravestone
Eyam - Riley Graves
4 - Eyam - Riley Graves
Eyam - Riley Graves
5 - Eyam - Riley Graves
Eyam Saxon cross
6 - Eyam Saxon cross
Eyam - brass band in welldressing parade
7 - Eyam - brass band in welldressing parade
Eyam Hall
8 - Eyam Hall
Eyam moor view of Froggatt edge
9 - Eyam moor view of Froggatt edge

No local visits found

Foolow

Slideshow

Foolow
Foolow
Foolow is a picturesque village clustered around a village green with an ancient cross and duckpond. It was formerly a lead-mining village and many of the houses are from the 17th century. The mere, or pond, is fed by natural springs and the shaft of the village cross is medieval, though the base is more recent and has a bull-baiting ring attached to it. There are no shops but there is a pub, the Bull's Head.

The area around is limestone and the village stands on the 'Foolow Beds'. Huge, deep slabs of Carboniferous limestones that mark the transition from the Dark Peak in the north to the White Peak in the south. There is much evidence of lead-mining locally. There are also some interesting geological features, such as Waterfall Swallet, where one of the local streams disappears underground. This lies along the road to Eyam. To the north the ground rises up to Eyam edge and the landscape changes rapidly to gritstone. The whole surrounding area is a fine one for relatively gentle walks.

Foolow has a well-dressing in late August.
 
Foolow Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bretton - the Barrel Inn
0 - Bretton - the Barrel Inn
Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
1 - Bretton Clough and Abney Low view
Foolow village green
2 - Foolow village green
Foolow - Waterfall swallet
3 - Foolow - Waterfall swallet

No local visits found

Froggatt

Slideshow

Froggatt is a small picturesque village which clings to the hillsides north of Baslow. It is sandwiched between the River Derwent below and the gritstone edges, from which it gets name, above and is surrounded by beautiful woodlands.

There is a pub, The Chequers, on the road to the top of the village but no other amenities. There is a fine old bridge across the River Derwent and good walking both along the river side and along Froggatt Edge above the village, which is one of the best gritstone rock climbing edges in Derbyshire. On the river there is a very large and impressive weir that was built in the 19th century to provide power for the mill downstream at Calver Bridge.
 
Froggatt Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Curbar Edge
0 - Curbar Edge
Curbar Edge view
1 - Curbar Edge view
Froggatt Edge - Chequers Crack
2 - Froggatt Edge - Chequers Crack
Froggatt Edge
3 - Froggatt Edge
Froggatt Edge climbers
4 - Froggatt Edge climbers
Froggat Edge - climbers on Valkyrie
5 - Froggat Edge - climbers on Valkyrie

No local visits found

Great Hucklow & Little Hucklow

Slideshow

Great Hucklow was once a lead-mining village and one of the former mines beneath the village was afterwards mined for fluorspar. It is now a pretty little village nestling below Hucklow Edge and has become a popular place to live. It was a centre of Unitarianism from the late 17th century and now has a Unitarian Conference Centre.

The village was once famous for its plays, which were written by a local resident, L. du Garde Peach, who lived in what is now the conference centre, and performed in a converted lead-smelting mill. These plays were based on local Derbyshire 'types' and acted by local people - du Garde Peach effectively created his own genre. The theatre ran from 1927 to 1972 and when du Garde Peach died in 1976 the tradition unfortunately died with him.

Above the village, on the plateau behind Hucklow Edge, there is the 'airfield' of the Derbyshire and Lancashire Gliding Club, and most weekends a number of gliders will be airborne overhead.

Great Hucklow has a well-dressing in mid-August.

Near to Great Hucklow are the small hamlets of Windmill, Grindlow and Little Hucklow. The walking around here is gentle and very pleasant with easily followed footpaths crossing old drystone wall field systems while above Great Hucklow there is access into the beautiful Bretton Clough.
 
Great Hucklow & Little Hucklow Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bretton - the Barrel Inn
0 - Bretton - the Barrel Inn
Abney Grange - a typical hill farm
1 - Abney Grange - a typical hill farm

No local visits found

Grindleford

Slideshow

Grindleford actually comprises Grindleford itself on the west bank of the River Derwent, and Padley on the east bank. Of the two, Padley has the more interesting history for Padley Hall was the seat of the Eyres of Padley, who were the local landlords for several centuries. The ruins of the hall lie beyond Grindleford station, (which also actually lies in Padley) just off the road which climbs up from Grindleford bridge to Fox House and Sheffield.

Modern Grindleford is a centre for walks, especially up Padley Gorge, a picturesque remnant of the deciduous forest which once covered the whole area. Above the gorge are the moors around Burbage and Froggatt edges and the isolated pub at Fox House, on the road to Sheffield. The station makes a good base for exploring the area and there is an excellent cafe here, which now also processes and sells Grindleford Spring Water.

On the Padley side there is a large hotel, the Maynard Arms, while on the edge of the village nearest Hathersage there is the Sir William, a pub taking its name from the old turnpike road which runs up the hill to Bretton. There are various shops and also the Derwent Gallery, which exhibits and sells the work of local artists. There is excellent walking also to be had on Eyam Moor to the West, with more deciduous woodland remnants and neolithic sites.
 
Grindleford Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bole Hill - abandoned millstones
0 - Bole Hill - abandoned millstones
Bole Hill - abandoned millstones
1 - Bole Hill - abandoned millstones
Burbage Brook
2 - Burbage Brook
Froggatt Edge - Chequers Crack
3 - Froggatt Edge - Chequers Crack
Froggatt Edge
4 - Froggatt Edge
Froggatt Edge climbers
5 - Froggatt Edge climbers
Froggat Edge - climbers on Valkyrie
6 - Froggat Edge - climbers on Valkyrie
Padley Chapel
7 - Padley Chapel

No local visits found

Hope

Slideshow

Hope is about the same size as nearby Castleton but of quite a different character, for though tourists do come to Hope, most of them pass through to other centres. The village is quite pretty, but dominated by the cement works which lies at the foot of Pindale.

The village lies at the junction of the River Noe and Peakshole Water, where the Edale valley meets the Hope valley. It was the base of the Eyre family, whose various branches became major landowners in this area of the Peak and played a significant role in its history. The original Eyre was said to have come with William the Conqueror and lost a leg in the battle of Hastings - hence the family crest has an armoured leg above the shield.

Hope Church
Hope Church
The church is mainly 14th Century and has a spire, unlike most other local churches. In the churchyard there is the stump of a Saxon Cross, indicating that this is a very old settlement. The South side of the church also has some fine gargoyles and there is a Norman font inside.

Around the church there are several shops and two pubs - the Woodroffe Arms Hotel and the Old Hall Hotel - the latter was once the house of the Balguys, a family of local landowners. There is also a car park with public toilets. There are further pubs along the road towards Castleton and along the Edale road.

On the north side of Hope valley, between the Noe and the Derwent, lie the two small secluded hamlets of Thornhill and Aston. Originally the Eyre family had their seat at Thornhill but there is nothing to see of this now.

Hope has a railway station 1km east of the village, near to Aston. This is on the Sheffield to Manchester line and has fairly frequent trains to both cities.

Hope has a well-dressing festival at the end of June. The large car-park at the centre of the village means that it is a good base for those wishing to walk the Great Ridge, over Lose Hill to Mam Tor
 
Hope Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Castleton - the entrance to Peak Cavern
0 - Castleton - the entrance to Peak Cavern
Castleton - Peak Cavern entrance with Peveril castle above
1 - Castleton - Peak Cavern entrance with Peveril castle above
Ladybower from Win Hill
2 - Ladybower from Win Hill
Cement Works, Hope Valley
3 - Cement Works, Hope Valley
Castleton Garland Day
4 - Castleton Garland Day
Castleton Garland King
5 - Castleton Garland King
Hope Church
6 - Hope Church
Win Hill summit
7 - Win Hill summit
Win Hill - climbing up from Twitchill Farm
8 - Win Hill - climbing up from Twitchill Farm
Win Hill - walking along Hope Brink
9 - Win Hill - walking along Hope Brink
Castleton - looking up Cave Dale
10 - Castleton - looking up Cave Dale
Hope Churchyard - Saxon cross
11 - Hope Churchyard - Saxon cross
Bamford Edge view of Ladybower
12 - Bamford Edge view of Ladybower

No local visits found

Hope Valley

Slideshow

Mam Tor
Mam Tor
The Hope Valley is a large, wide valley running East-West along the boundary between the gritstone moors and edges of the 'Dark Peak' and the limestone outcrops and deep cut dales of the 'White Peak'. Best known as wonderful walking country, it is also a haven for many others including bikers, pony trekkers, hang-gliders, rockclimbers and potholers as well as for the quieter activities of artists, anglers and birdwatchers.

Winnats Pass
Winnats Pass
Mam Tor, the 'Shivering Mountain' heads the valley. Now a launch pad for hang-gliders, it was once the home of Iron Age people whose fort can still be seen on top of the hill. The spectacular Winnats Pass is the only road in from the west now that the road down the shivering face of Mam Tor has been swept away by repeated landslips. A classic collapsed gorge, Winnats Pass threads its way between steep limestone crags in an area honeycombed with potholes and old lead mines, source of the unique and attractive Blue John stone.

Castleton is a centre for visiting many of these old workings, which can also be seen at Bagshawe Cavern near Bradwell and at Poole's Cavern in Buxton. Blue John is turned into jewellery in Castleton's craft shops and the village is famous too for its Christmas lights and the ancient Garland Ceremony held every May.

Peveril castle
Peveril castle
Guarding the village is the prominent Norman keep of Peveril Castle, halfway up the cliff above it and built in 1088 by William I's illegitimate son William Peveril. A man despised by the locals at the time.

To the north of the valley a walk from Mam Tor to Losehill along the ridge dividing the Hope and Edale valleys gives unrivalled views in both directions.
Climbers on Stanage
Climbers on Stanage
From here the walker can descend into Hope - the central village of the valley, with its fine church and Saxon cross. Additional attractions here include tempting shops and the old established sheep and cattle market.

The train from Manchester or Sheffield is a popular way to visit the valley. From the west, the line bursts out of the Cowburn Tunnel to stop at Edale - the next valley north of Hope Valley, a great centre for walkers, pony trekkers and campers and the start of the Pennine Way. The railway follows the Edale Valley to its junction with Hope Valley just east of Hope Village and continues eastwards with stations at Hope, Bamford and Hathersage.

The three rivers which define the valley are; Peak Water, rising from Peak Cavern and flowing to Hope; the River Noe, rising on Kinder Scout near Edale and flowing down to join Peak Water near Hope; and the River Derwent, rising on Howden Moor before flowing through a series of massive reservoirs on its way to meet the Noe at Bamford. These reservoirs are another important recreational centre. Bicycles can be hired to explore their pine clad slopes or perhaps you would rather sample the excellent fishing on the Ladybower Reservoir at the Eastern end of the A57, Snake Pass.

Ladybower Reservoir
Ladybower Reservoir
After leaving Bamford, the Derwent meanders tranquilly to Hathersage, the largest village in the valley and another good shopping centre but which also has a swimming pool, a church which is famous for brass rubbings and the reputed site of Little John's grave. Above Hathersage the rocks of Stanage Edge and other gritstone edges loom on the horizon - these are a testing training ground for rock-climbers of all abilities.

At Hathersage the Derwent makes a sharp right turn to flow southwards. This appears to make the Hope Valley appear apart from the rest of the Derwent Valley and from the surrounding uplands - hemmed in by the slopes of Mam Tor to the west and by the gritstone edges to the east.
 
Hope Valley Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Castleton - the entrance to Peak Cavern
0 - Castleton - the entrance to Peak Cavern
Castleton - Peak Cavern entrance with Peveril castle above
1 - Castleton - Peak Cavern entrance with Peveril castle above
Ladybower from Win Hill
2 - Ladybower from Win Hill
Cement Works, Hope Valley
3 - Cement Works, Hope Valley
Castleton Garland Day
4 - Castleton Garland Day
Castleton Garland King
5 - Castleton Garland King
Hope Church
6 - Hope Church
Win Hill summit
7 - Win Hill summit
Win Hill - climbing up from Twitchill Farm
8 - Win Hill - climbing up from Twitchill Farm
Win Hill - walking along Hope Brink
9 - Win Hill - walking along Hope Brink
Castleton - looking up Cave Dale
10 - Castleton - looking up Cave Dale
Hope Churchyard - Saxon cross
11 - Hope Churchyard - Saxon cross
Bamford Edge view of Ladybower
12 - Bamford Edge view of Ladybower

No local visits found

Stoney Middleton

Slideshow

Stoney Middleton lies at the foot of Middleton Dale, a spectacular cliff-lined valley which has been much affected by long years of quarrying. The village centre lies just off the main A623 road and is surprisingly secluded and quiet.

There is a small church, St Martin's, which was originally built by Joan Eyre to commemorate her husband's safe return from Agincourt in 1415. Only the tower is original, the nave having burnt down in a fire in 1757 to be replaced in 1759 by an unusual octagonal building.

Nearby are some low buildings which are advertised as the 'Roman Baths', though the current building was constructed in the 19th century. These are fed by some warm springs which issue from the hillside and historical evidence indicates that they were in use from Celtic times, probably forming the focus of a shrine to an aquatic goddess. The earliest documented references to the springs are medieval, but numerous Roman coins have been found locally.

Clustered along the main road is the former toll bar, now a fish and chip shop, a pub called The Moon and an Indian restaurant. Just above the restaurant is 'Lover's Leap' where, in 1762 the jilted Hannah Baddaley flung herself off the clifftop, only to be saved by her voluminous skirts, which acted as a parachute. Sadly she died of natural causes only two years later, still unwed.

Higher up the valley, at the foot of Middleton Dale, the scenery is dominated by Windover Buttress, home of some of the most spectacular rock climbs of the area. There are also several important pot-holes in this dale, notably Carlswark cavern.

Stoney Middleton has a well-dressing in late July.

The upland area to the south of Middleton Dale (between Stoney Middleton and Longstone Edge) has been mined extensively for Fluorspar, leaving large settling ponds full of 'tailings', and resembles a moonscape. It is well worth a visit just to see this scene of desolation. Further south there is the open moorlands of Longstone Edge, one of the few ecologically sensitive Limestone Heaths in the area. Longstone Edge offers excellent walking and views.
 
Stoney Middleton Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Eyam Plague Cottages
0 - Eyam Plague Cottages
Eyam Churchyard
1 - Eyam Churchyard
Eyam cottages with plague signpost
2 - Eyam cottages with plague signpost
Eyam churchyard - Plague gravestone
3 - Eyam churchyard - Plague gravestone
Eyam - Riley Graves
4 - Eyam - Riley Graves
Eyam - Riley Graves
5 - Eyam - Riley Graves
Eyam Saxon cross
6 - Eyam Saxon cross
Eyam - brass band in welldressing parade
7 - Eyam - brass band in welldressing parade
Eyam Hall
8 - Eyam Hall

No local visits found

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