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Peak District Towns and Villages: Magpie Mine

Villages around Magpie Mine

Slideshow

 Ashford in the Water


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Ashford is an attractive and popular little village lying on the River Wye, just upstream of Bakewell. It has a long history, and from the Iron Age or earlier was one of the major crossing points on the Wye. The river and the bridges across it are major features of Ashford. Sheepwash Bridge dates from the 17th century and has a pen next to it for the purpose of washing the sheep, a practice which continued until quite recently. Downstream, Mill Bridge is dated 1664, but is newer than Sheepwash Bridge.

Sheepwash Bridge
Sheepwash Bridge
The church has some parts dating from the 12th century, including a south door with its original Norman tympanium showing a tree of life in the centre with a hog and wolf facing it. There is a 14th century tower and font, but the church was heavily restored, nay rebuilt, in the 1870s, and most of the building dates from then.

An ancient local custom unique to this village was that of hanging funeral garlands from the roof of the church. Four garlands still hang there, the oldest from 1747. They were made of white paper cut to form rosettes and fixed to a wooden frame. They would then be carried before the coffin of a young virgin in the funeral procession, before being hung up.

In the church is the grave of Henry Watson (d. 1786), who was responsible for the commercial exploitation of Ashford Black Marble. Not a true marble, this impure limestone comes up an attractive shiny black colour when polished. It was quarried from Kirk Dale and Rookery Wood just outside Ashford and was used at an early date in both Hardwick Hall and Chatsworth House. Watson's invention in 1748 of machinery for cutting and polishing the marble allowed it to be mass-produced and it became very fashionable. Watson's machinery used water power from a mill on the River Wye near the foot of Kirk Dale, which closed in 1905, though the foundations may still be seen. Examples of Ashford Marble are on display in Buxton Museum.

A further 2km upstream, on the River Wye, lies the outlet for Magpie Sough, built in 1873, an impressive 2km long underground 'drain' for the Magpie mine at Sheldon. Lead mining was extremely important in this area until the end of the 19th century.

Ashford has an annual well-dressing which is held during the week of Pentecost - six weeks after Easter (usually late May/early June). There are about 6 wells to dress, and this is one of the largest such festivals.

The village has a shop and a couple of pubs.
 
Ashford in the Water Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Ashford Church
0 - Ashford Church
Ashford Welldressing
1 - Ashford Welldressing
Ashford Welldressing
2 - Ashford Welldressing
Ashford - Sheepwash Bridge
3 - Ashford - Sheepwash Bridge
Slideshow

 Bakewell


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Bakewell Church
Bakewell Church
Bakewell's name is said to derive from the warm springs in the area - the Domesday book entry calls the town 'Badequella', meaning Bath-well.

The town was built on the West bank of the Wye at a spot where it was fordable and the site was probably occupied in Roman times (there is a Roman altar at Haddon Hall, found nearby). The Saxons left their mark here and in 924 Edward the Elder ordered a fortified borough to be built here.

The church was founded in 920 and some Saxon fragments can be seen in the porch. However, although parts are Norman, most of the modern building dates from the 13th century and it was then virtually rebuilt in the 1840s. It contains many interesting monuments and is well worth a visit.

A few yards up the hill from the church is the award-winning Old House Museum, housed in one of the few genuinely medieval buildings of the area. This house serves as a local history museum and is in the care of the Bakewell Historical Society. Other places of historical interest include Bagshaw Hall, a fine 17th century house built by a rich lawyer, and several old buildings down King Street, such as the Old Town Hall, the Red Tudor House and the Hospital of the Knight of St John. Just off the Buxton Road lies Victoria Mill, which ground corn from water power until 1939.

The old bridge at Bakewell
The old bridge at Bakewell
Two of the original wells (which serve up water rich in iron at a temperature of 15 degrees Centigrade) still survive. These are the Bath-well in Bath Street and Holywell (or Pete well) in the recreation ground. The others have been filled in long ago. Likewise, little except the bridge across the Wye (built around 1300 though widened since then) now survives of the old Bakewell, which was quite medieval in character until the early 19th century. In 1777 Arkwright opened a mill in the town and it was perhaps the resulting surge in prosperity which caused the town to be largely rebuilt in the 19th century.

One such building is the Rutland Arms, overlooking the town square and built in 1804. Jane Austen stayed here in 1811 and in Pride and Prejudice she has Elizabeth Bennet stopping here to meet the Darcys and Mr Bingley. However the Rutland Arms' chief claim to fame is as the place where the Bakewell Pudding (Bakewell has never heard of tarts) was invented by a chef of 1859 who made a mistake. You can now buy Bakewell Puddings at several establishments across the town, all claiming to have the original unique recipe.

Bakewell has one of the oldest markets in the area, dating from at least 1300. The first recorded fair was held in 1254. Markets are still held every Monday and, unlike most of the other local centres, there is a thriving livestock market at the recently rebuilt Agricultural Centre, which is well worth a visit. The big event of the year is the annual Bakewell Show, which takes place the first Wednesday and Thursday in August and attracts farmers and many others from all over the Peak District and surrounding area.

Bakewell from the river
Bakewell from the river
There are some very pleasant walks along the river from the bridge in the centre of town. Downstream leads to the recreation ground and upstream takes you to the site of Arkwright's mill, via Holme Hall (a fortified manor house dated 1626) and Holme Bridge (dated 1664). The mill burned down in 1868, but the cottages associated with it (Lumford Terrace), still survive.

Bakewell has a full range of shops, pubs and restaurants. There are numerous options for accommodation and there is also a Youth Hostel.

Bakewell has an annual well dressing and carnival, held in late June and it is the home of the Peak District National Park Authority, who have their main offices at Aldern House, Baslow Road. They also operate the town's information centre which is in the old Market Hall in Bridge street, with a parking area (except on market days) and public toilets next to it. It is open daily 9.30am - 5.30pm in summer and 9.30am - 1pm in winter. Telephone: 01629 813227
 
Bakewell Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bakewell Church
0 - Bakewell Church
Bakewell Church - Norman north door
1 - Bakewell Church - Norman north door
Bakewell Church - Saxon stone fragments
2 - Bakewell Church - Saxon stone fragments
Bakewell Church - medieval coffin lids
3 - Bakewell Church - medieval coffin lids
Bakewell Church - Norman font
4 - Bakewell Church - Norman font
Bakewell Church - Foljambe monument
5 - Bakewell Church - Foljambe monument
Bakewell Church - Tomb of Sir Thomas Wendesley
6 - Bakewell Church - Tomb of Sir Thomas Wendesley
Bakewell Church - Saxon cross stump
7 - Bakewell Church - Saxon cross stump
Bakewell - view of the town from the riverside
8 - Bakewell - view of the town from the riverside
Bakewell livestock market
9 - Bakewell livestock market
Bakewell bridge over the River Wye
10 - Bakewell bridge over the River Wye
Bakewell Church - Saxon Cross
11 - Bakewell Church - Saxon Cross
Bakewell Church - medieval stone graves
12 - Bakewell Church - medieval stone graves
Bakewell - Old House museum
13 - Bakewell - Old House museum
Bakewell - view of the church and the town
14 - Bakewell - view of the church and the town
Slideshow

 Chelmorton


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Chelmorton has a real upland feel to it, sitting as it does in a natural bowl surrounded by low hills. It is in fact one of the highest villages of the area. The site is an ancient one, with a spring rising just above the modern village, near the church. This church is the highest in Derbyshire and was built in Norman times - the south arcade still dates from this time while the north arcade and the tower are thirteenth century - the spire was added much later.

Field patterns at Chelmorton
Field patterns at Chelmorton
Chelmorton village still retains a pattern which was probably laid down in Saxon times - a linear village laid out along a single street, with farms at intervals along the street. Uniquely amongst local villages, there have been no significant additions to this layout in recent times.

Another aspect of interest around Chelmorton is the field patterns. Those around the village are in 13 long narrow strips, a system dating from medieval times (and maybe as far back as Saxon times) but only enclosed relatively recently - probably in the 17th century. The larger fields more distant from the village were enclosed as late as 1805, and these are of a completely different shape - larger and usually almost square. This type of field pattern can also be seen near some other local villages, such as Litton. Another echo of the past is the name of the road which runs across the bottom end of the village. This is the old road between Buxton and Bakewell and is called 'The Ditch', a name which may be a relic of an ancient village boundary.

There is a public house, the Church Inn, and good footpaths lead directly from the village into the adjacent hills, particularly Chelmorton Low with the neolithic burial chamber at Five Wells Farm.
 
Chelmorton Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Chelmorton view of old field patterns
0 - Chelmorton view of old field patterns
Deepdale (King Sterndale) flowers
1 - Deepdale (King Sterndale) flowers
Deepdale (King Sterndale) - Thirst House cave
2 - Deepdale (King Sterndale) - Thirst House cave
Taddington - Five Wells chambered cairn
3 - Taddington - Five Wells chambered cairn
Chelmorton Church
4 - Chelmorton Church
Slideshow

 Cressbrook


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Cressbrook is located on the River Wye about 4 miles north of Bakewell. It grew up around a cotton mill and consists mainly of former mill cottages, though some of the oldest houses in and around the village are lead miners' cottages, testifying to a history that predates the mill.

Cressbrook Mill
Cressbrook Mill
The mill is still the major building in the village though now it has been converted into apartments. The original mill was built by Sir Richard Arkwright in 1779 but this burnt down in 1785 and was rebuilt by Richard Arkwright Jnr in 1787. A large extension (Wye Mill - Grade II* listed) was commissioned in 1814 and erected by William Newton on behalf on J L Philips and Brother, Cotton Spinners. Newton was a local character whom Anna Seward dubbed 'The Minstrel of the Peak'. Behind the mill are apprentices cottages, older than the current main mill building by several years. These were built to house orphans brought as child apprentices from London to work in the mill.

In 1820 the tiny cottages in Ravensdale (known locally as 'The Wick') were built followed in 1840 the model village of pretty cottages at the top of the hill. The Cressbrook mill owners were generally philanthropic and as well as fine housing they provided piped water pumped up the hill from a spring near the river and they funded the village band, which still survives.

Above the mill is Cressbrook Hall, the house of mill-owner Henry McConnel. The house stands on a bluff overlooking the river and is a fanciful piece of Gothic architecture. The position is superb, with magnificent views down Monsal Dale. Farther up the hill is the rest of the village, for the most part consisting of the cottages once occupied by the millworkers.

The heyday of the mill was the 19th century when it produced high-quality cotton for lacemaking. After World War I all the local mills struggled to make a profit and cotton spinning ceased here in 1965. The mill finally closed in 1971 after which it was allowed to decay for several years before being restored.

The demise of the cotton industry brought great changes to the village. As there is now almost no employment within the village the population has declined and faster transport links have meant that they have been replaced by an influx of older professional people who work within a wide radius of the village. House prices have risen so that local young people can rarely afford them. This has meant that the population has aged - to the extent that the local school closed in 1997, when its roll was down to 6 pupils. A number of the cottages have become second homes or holiday homes, and of course many of these are empty for much of the year.

The scenery around is magnificent. Along the River Wye, just upstream of Cressbrook Mill lies Water-cum-Jolly, a beautiful river gorge with fine limestone cliffs which attract many rock-climbers, bird-watchers, walkers and fishermen. North of the mill lies Cressbrook Dale, or Ravensdale, a fine gorge-like limestone dale with numerous crags and the remains of several lead mines. Most of this dale is a National Nature Reserve renowned for its range of rare flowers.

The village has a fete and well dressing each year in early June.
 
Cressbrook Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Monsal Dale - river Wye
0 - Monsal Dale - river Wye
Monsal Dale
1 - Monsal Dale
Cressbrook Dale
2 - Cressbrook Dale
Cressbrook Mill
3 - Cressbrook Mill
Cressbrook 'New' Houses
4 - Cressbrook 'New' Houses
Cressbrook - Ravens Crag
5 - Cressbrook - Ravens Crag
Litton - Tansley Dale flowers
6 - Litton - Tansley Dale flowers
Litton - Tansley Dale walls
7 - Litton - Tansley Dale walls
Water cum Jolly and Cressbrook millpond
8 - Water cum Jolly and Cressbrook millpond
Water cum Jolly
9 - Water cum Jolly
Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
10 - Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
Cressbrook mill workers' cottages
11 - Cressbrook mill workers' cottages
Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
12 - Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
Slideshow

 Flagg


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Flagg is located between Monyash and Taddington, high up in the centre of the limestone dome that makes up the White Peak. It is rich pastureland and Flagg is a predominantly farming community. Aside from the many local farms there is a Hall of 16th Century origin.

On the A515, which pass Flagg to the south, lie two pubs, the Duke of York and the Bull I' th' Thorn. The latter has been a hostelry since 1472, much added to since that time, but is one of the oldest surviving buildings in the area. It is well worth a visit to sample its interior, in the centre of which is the medieval hall house which predates the hostelry.

Flagg races, a point-to-point event, take place here on Easter Tuesday every year. This is a quite unique event of the area and usually attracts large crowds. Point-to-point over an area of limestone walls is a notably dangerous sport!
 
Flagg Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge
Deepdale (Sheldon)
0 - Deepdale (Sheldon)
Slideshow

 Hassop


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Hassop has an imposing look, due to the splendour of the architecture left behind by the Eyre family, the local landlords and builders of Hassop Hall. The Hall is now a private hotel but it retains the fine buildings and classical park (with lake) that the Eyres erected. The Eyres were devout Catholics and so the large Classical style church which draws your eye as you pass through the village is a Catholic one. As well as being landowners, the family made much money from lead-mining and it is said that there are two large manholes in the floor of the cellar of the Hall which lead to a former lead-mine.

The village has a pub called, not surprisingly, the Eyre Arms.
 
Slideshow

 Longstone


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Longstone is made up of two small villages, Great and Little Longstone. The villages have many fine 18th century cottages, built during an era of prosperity from lead-mining and shoemaking. There is a village green in Great Longstone, with an ancient cross and a nearby manor house which has medieval origins. Across the road is Longstone Hall, originally built during the 14th century, but rebuilt in the mid 18th, with a prominent brick facade. There is a rather nice church hidden round the back of the village.

Great Longstone church
Great Longstone church
There is a shop and two pubs in Great Longstone, the Crispin (patron saint of shoemakers) and The White Lion, while Little Longstone has the Packhorse.

Great Longstone and Little Longstone have well-dressings in late July.

Just along the road, to the west of Little Longstone, is Monsal Head, a famous beauty spot and viewpoint. There is a small car park with a fine view down the valley, and a much larger car park, with public toilets, 100m away. A few hundred metres towards Ashford there is an old Quaker burial ground.

To the north of Longstone lies Longstone Edge, a fine viewpoint for the surrounding countryside. Unfortunately the top of the edge has been intensively quarried for lead and, more recently fluorspar, which has left some impressive holes in the ground but rather detracts from its scenic value.
 
Longstone Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Monsal Head Viaduct
0 - Monsal Head Viaduct
Monsal Dale - river Wye
1 - Monsal Dale - river Wye
Monsal Dale
2 - Monsal Dale
Longstone parish church
3 - Longstone parish church
Entrance to Headstone Tunnel below Monsal Head
4 - Entrance to Headstone Tunnel below Monsal Head
Slideshow

 Middleton by Youlgreave


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Middleton cottages
Middleton cottages
Middleton by Youlgreave is a quiet, leafy place built above the River Bradford, upstream of its larger neighbour. There was once a castle here, a fact commemorated in the name of Castle Farm, but the modern village was mostly constructed in the 19th century around the hall, which is hidden behind trees at the southern end of the village.

The most notable feature of the village is the grave of Thomas Bateman (1820-61), an important local archaeologist and excavator of some 500 local barrows. Though he took some care to record and analyse his finds, his methods were unfortunately not nearly as scientific as modern techniques, and he was known to have excavated as many as five barrows in one day. Many of his finds are now in Sheffield Museum, and some in the British Museum. He is buried in a field behind the former Congregational chapel, in a small enclosure surrounded by cast-iron railings. A barrow would perhaps have been more appropriate.

On the village green there is a playground and public toilets, and alongside there is a more recent memorial to the crew of a Lancaster bomber which crashed at nearby Smerrill in 1944.

The walking around Middleton is excellent. Bradford Dale is beautiful and the high, limestone pasturelands around the village harbour much archaeology, both ancient and industrial.
 
Middleton by Youlgreave Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Youlgrave church - exterior view
0 - Youlgrave church - exterior view
Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
1 - Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
2 - Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
3 - Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
4 - Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
Bradford Dale
5 - Bradford Dale
Middleton by Youlgrave - Thomas Bateman\'s tomb
6 - Middleton by Youlgrave - Thomas Bateman\'s tomb
Fluorspar workings on Long Rake
7 - Fluorspar workings on Long Rake
Middleton by Youlgrave
8 - Middleton by Youlgrave
Over Haddon stile
9 - Over Haddon stile
Youlgrave YHA
10 - Youlgrave YHA
Youlgrave water cistern
11 - Youlgrave water cistern
Youlgrave public house
12 - Youlgrave public house
Slideshow

 Miller's Dale


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Miller's Dale was once an important railway junction, where passengers for Buxton joined or left the trains between London and Manchester on the old Midland Railway. Since the railway was closed in 1970 the station has become an important car park and access point to local walks. The hamlet is still dominated by the impressive, massive railway viaducts across the Wye valley here.

Millers Dale view
Millers Dale view
Miller's Dale is an excellent centre from which to explore the gorges of the Wye and the high limestone plateau around it. Ravenstor, towards Litton Mill, is a fearsome overhanging limestone cliff on which local rock climbers practise, and there is more rock-climbing in Cheedale, upstream of Miller's Dale.

Downstream lies Litton Mill, a small hamlet grouped around a former cotton mill on the River Wye. The mill was built in the late 18th century and burned down in 1897 (there is a photograph in the Angler's Rest in Millers Dale), but was then rebuilt. In its early years the mill was known locally and nationally for its harsh treatment of its apprentices, many of whom were orphans both local and from as far away as London. This was the subject of an expose in the form of a book by Robert Blincoe in 1832 which is said to have helped the passage of the Factories Act of 1833 and may have inspired Dickens when he wrote Oliver Twist.

There are two Nature Reserves near Miller's Dale. Priestcliffe Lees and Station Quarry belongs to Derbyshire Naturalists' Trust, while Monk's Dale (a dry tributary valley of the Wye) is a National Nature Reserve. Both are rich in classic limestone flora and fauna of the area.

There is a small church and a pub, the Angler's Arms and 1km away is Ravenstor Youth Hostel.
 
Miller's Dale Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Miller's Dale
0 - Miller's Dale
Cressbrook 'New' Houses
1 - Cressbrook 'New' Houses
Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
2 - Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
Water cum Jolly and Cressbrook millpond
3 - Water cum Jolly and Cressbrook millpond
Water cum Jolly
4 - Water cum Jolly
Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
5 - Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
Cressbrook mill workers' cottages
6 - Cressbrook mill workers' cottages
Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
7 - Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
Slideshow

 Monyash


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Monyash is an unspoilt village clustered around the village green, its main preoccupation is now farming and tourism but at it was an important lead-mining centre from medieval times to the end of the 19th century and had its own Barmote Court. The village cross dates from 1340, when Monyash was granted a licence for a weekly market and two annual fairs. Around the village may be seen characteristic narrow fields which were enclosures of medieval strips and, further away, the larger fields which resulted from the 1771 Enclosures Act.

Monyash and the surrounding area have been settled since Neolithic times, as can be inferred from its proximity to Arbor Low, which dates from 2000BC or earlier. The village has a good water source and sits on a deposit of clay, which means that the water does not sink immediately into underlying limestone, as it usually does in this area. This led to the creation of several ponds or 'meres' and at least one survives until the present day. The village was mentioned in the Domesday Book as 'Maneis', which is often translated as 'many ash trees' (cf. Oxford Dictionary of British Placenames), but research by Professor Bob Johnston indicates that it is more likely derived from the Old English words mani and eas for many waters.

The Romans built a road which follows the ridge to the south-east of the village, and which probably follows the line of a much earlier trackway. Later, the Saxons overran the area, which became part of the territory of the 'Pecsaete' tribe (some people believe that 'Peak District' is derived from this tribe's name) and a celebrated Saxon burial at Benty Grange just south of Monyash was probably one of their chieftains.

Monyash
Monyash
Some of the farms are quite ancient, such as One Ash Grange, about a mile from the main village, which was originally a farming outpost of Roche Abbey. It later belonged to the Bowman family, who were noted Quakers - and the village became a Quaker centre because it was also the home of John Gratton, a prominent early Quaker. Though it is no longer used as such, the Quaker meeting house still stands along the road towards Flagg and behind it there is a poignant Quaker cemetery. John Bright, of the Anti Corn-Law League, was a friend of the Bowman family and spent his honeymoon at One Ash Grange.

The lead mines for which Monyash was famous also provide a Quaker connection, since they were worked in the 17th and 18th centuries by the London Lead Company, a Quaker firm. Sheldon House was once one of the mining offices and the miners were said to have queued for their pay here.

Evidence of other industries of bygone days may be found in the local names of Shuttle Lane and Chandler House. Monyash's most recent claim to fame is as the burial place of Sir Maurice Oldfield, a local man who became the head of MI6 and was the model for 'M' in the James Bond books.

The village lies at the head of Lathkill Dale and is therefore very busy with walkers and hikers at weekends, since it is a good base for exploring the surrounding area. There is a pub, the Bull's Head, where the Barmote Court still meets twice yearly. Next door to the Bull's Head there is a popular cafe. Monyash has an annual well-dressing at the end of May.
 
Monyash Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Magpie Mine
0 - Magpie Mine
Magpie Mine
1 - Magpie Mine
Magpie Mine
2 - Magpie Mine
Lathkill Dale - view from Haddon Grove with spring flowers
3 - Lathkill Dale - view from Haddon Grove with spring flowers
Monyash
4 - Monyash
Lathkill Dale
5 - Lathkill Dale
Lathkill Dale - upper section under snow
6 - Lathkill Dale - upper section under snow
Monyash well dressing, 2004
7 - Monyash well dressing, 2004
Lathkill House Cave
8 - Lathkill House Cave
Slideshow

 Over Haddon


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Over Haddon is a picturesque former lead-mining village clinging to the top of the steep side of Lathkill Dale to the south of Bakewell. It is a popular stopping point for weekend walkers in the Lathkill valley and has a useful car park, though using this does involve a steep descent (and thus ascent) into (and out of) Lathkill Dale below. The village has a pub called The Lathkill.

Lathkill Dale is a beautiful and fascinating place. An alternative perspective can be achieved by following the gorge top access land from the access point to the south of Haddon Grove Farm, one mile to the west of Over Haddon.
 
Over Haddon Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Lathkill Dale - the remains of the aqueduct from Mandale Mine
0 - Lathkill Dale - the remains of the aqueduct from Mandale Mine
Lathkill River
1 - Lathkill River
Conksbury Bridge
2 - Conksbury Bridge
Over Haddon village
3 - Over Haddon village
Over Haddon stile
4 - Over Haddon stile
Mandale Mine engine house
5 - Mandale Mine engine house
Mandale Mine buildings
6 - Mandale Mine buildings
Slideshow

 Sheldon


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Sheldon is a small farming hamlet perched high above the River Wye, South of Ashford. From just outside the village there are fine views of the Wye and the lower part of Monsal Dale.

Lead mining flourished around here in the 18th and 19th centuries and most of Sheldon dates from this period. One of the most famous and certainly the best-preserved Peak District mine, the Magpie Mine, lies just 1km south of here.

Sheldon has a pub, the Cock and Pullet, popular with hikers.
 
Sheldon Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Magpie Mine
0 - Magpie Mine
Magpie Mine
1 - Magpie Mine
Magpie Mine
2 - Magpie Mine
Sheldon Cottages
3 - Sheldon Cottages
Monsal Dale view from Sheldon
4 - Monsal Dale view from Sheldon
Slideshow

 Taddington


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Taddington is clustered around an ancient well on the north side of a ridge formed by a sill of Dolerite in the surrounding limestone. It is one of the highest villages in the area.

The church is mostly 14th century and has an enigmatic decorated shaft in the churchyard. The origins of the shaft are obscure, but it dates from at least Norman times.

Taddington
Taddington
About 2km West of the village, on the escarpment lies Five Wells chambered cairn. This is the highest megalithic tomb in England and must have been an impressive construction on this high point before it was eroded by the elements and robbed for stone. It is a superb viewpoint, with a magnificent view over the surrounding area. Twelve burials were found in the tomb when it was excavated.

At the eastern, lower end of the village (known as Town End), is a pub, the Queen's Arms, and outside the village on the A6 lies the Waterloo Hotel. Taddington has a well-dressing in mid-August.

Blackwell and Priestcliffe are two hamlets of a dozen houses each, sited between Taddington and the River Wye. Most of the dwellings are active farms.

The area below Blackwell, between it and the River Wye, has a series of ridges and terraces in the fields which are the remnants of a Britano-Roman field system, dating from around 400 AD. This was centred around a fortified settlement on the top of Chee Tor, overlooking the River Wye.
 
Taddington Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Taddington - Five Wells chambered cairn
0 - Taddington - Five Wells chambered cairn
Miller's Dale
1 - Miller's Dale
Monsal Dale view from Sheldon
2 - Monsal Dale view from Sheldon
Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
3 - Miller's Dale - Raven Tor
Taddington view
4 - Taddington view
Taddington church
5 - Taddington church
Water cum Jolly
6 - Water cum Jolly
Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
7 - Water cum Jolly - Cressbrook Hall and millpond
Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
8 - Water cum Jolly from the Monsal Trail
Slideshow

 Youlgrave


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Youlgrave (or Youlgreave as the Ordnance Survey persist in calling it) is a sleepy village. Now mainly devoted to farming it was once one of the centres of the Derbyshire lead-mining industry. Though lead is no longer mined some of the old mines are still used for the extraction of fluorspar and calcite but this is low-level and unobtrusive.

Youlgrave Church
Youlgrave Church
The village was built on a ridge between the rivers Bradford and Lathkill, and is a fine centre for exploring both of these beautiful valleys. The village spills down the slope to the Bradford to the south in a topsy-turvy fashion. The river is often dry here in summer, having found an underground course to the Derwent at Darley Dale in 1881, but the dale upstream is very pretty.

At the crossroads at the eastern end of the village lie the George Hotel and the church and from here the main road goes westwards past rows of old cottages.
Conduit Head
Conduit Head
There are several shops and a second pub before you reach the former Market Place where the main feature is the Conduit Head, a large circular tank which was once an integral part of the village's water supply. Opposite, the former Co-op building now houses the Youth Hostel.

The church is one of the most interesting in the Peak, and the village contains many rows of lovely old cottages. Behind the Market Place is the original Hall, now Old Hall Farm, a grand building dated 1630, and there are some fine buildings along the main street.

Downstream of Youlgreave the hamlet of Alport lies at the junction of the Lathkill and Bradford rivers. It is a pretty spot and a good place to start a circular walk of the two valleys.
 
Youlgrave Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Youlgrave church - exterior view
0 - Youlgrave church - exterior view
Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
1 - Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
2 - Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
3 - Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
4 - Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
5 - Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
Lathkill Dale - the remains of the aqueduct from Mandale Mine
6 - Lathkill Dale - the remains of the aqueduct from Mandale Mine
Bradford Dale
7 - Bradford Dale
Conksbury Bridge
8 - Conksbury Bridge
Middleton by Youlgrave - Thomas Bateman\'s tomb
9 - Middleton by Youlgrave - Thomas Bateman\'s tomb
Cratcliffe Tor
10 - Cratcliffe Tor
Fluorspar workings on Long Rake
11 - Fluorspar workings on Long Rake
Middleton by Youlgrave
12 - Middleton by Youlgrave
Over Haddon village
13 - Over Haddon village
Over Haddon stile
14 - Over Haddon stile
Youlgrave YHA
15 - Youlgrave YHA
Youlgrave water cistern
16 - Youlgrave water cistern
Youlgrave public house
17 - Youlgrave public house
Mandale Mine engine house
18 - Mandale Mine engine house
Mandale Mine buildings
19 - Mandale Mine buildings

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