Villages around Stanton Moor

Aldwark

Slideshow

Aldwark Farm
Aldwark Farm
People have lived in Aldwark (the name is Saxon meaning 'Old Fort') since ancient times and there are several Neolithic burial sites in the surrounding fields. Flint arrowheads have been found in these fields and the burial mound of Greenlow lies a short distance outside the hamlet. Minninglow, one of the most famous Neolithic burial sites in the area, lies only a mile away.

In the 18th century Aldwark was a busy staging post for stagecoaches plying the Buxton - Derby route, and had several inns, but these have all closed and now it is a peaceful and secluded farming hamlet.
 

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Aldwark Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge
Aldwark farm
0 - Aldwark farm

Bakewell

Slideshow

Bakewell Church
Bakewell Church
Bakewell's name is said to derive from the warm springs in the area - the Domesday book entry calls the town 'Badequella', meaning Bath-well.

The town was built on the West bank of the Wye at a spot where it was fordable and the site was probably occupied in Roman times (there is a Roman altar at Haddon Hall, found nearby). The Saxons left their mark here and in 924 Edward the Elder ordered a fortified borough to be built here.

The church was founded in 920 and some Saxon fragments can be seen in the porch. However, although parts are Norman, most of the modern building dates from the 13th century and it was then virtually rebuilt in the 1840s. It contains many interesting monuments and is well worth a visit.

A few yards up the hill from the church is the award-winning Old House Museum, housed in one of the few genuinely medieval buildings of the area. This house serves as a local history museum and is in the care of the Bakewell Historical Society. Other places of historical interest include Bagshaw Hall, a fine 17th century house built by a rich lawyer, and several old buildings down King Street, such as the Old Town Hall, the Red Tudor House and the Hospital of the Knight of St John. Just off the Buxton Road lies Victoria Mill, which ground corn from water power until 1939.

The old bridge at Bakewell
The old bridge at Bakewell
Two of the original wells (which serve up water rich in iron at a temperature of 15 degrees Centigrade) still survive. These are the Bath-well in Bath Street and Holywell (or Pete well) in the recreation ground. The others have been filled in long ago. Likewise, little except the bridge across the Wye (built around 1300 though widened since then) now survives of the old Bakewell, which was quite medieval in character until the early 19th century. In 1777 Arkwright opened a mill in the town and it was perhaps the resulting surge in prosperity which caused the town to be largely rebuilt in the 19th century.

One such building is the Rutland Arms, overlooking the town square and built in 1804. Jane Austen stayed here in 1811 and in Pride and Prejudice she has Elizabeth Bennet stopping here to meet the Darcys and Mr Bingley. However the Rutland Arms' chief claim to fame is as the place where the Bakewell Pudding (Bakewell has never heard of tarts) was invented by a chef of 1859 who made a mistake. You can now buy Bakewell Puddings at several establishments across the town, all claiming to have the original unique recipe.

Bakewell has one of the oldest markets in the area, dating from at least 1300. The first recorded fair was held in 1254. Markets are still held every Monday and, unlike most of the other local centres, there is a thriving livestock market at the recently rebuilt Agricultural Centre, which is well worth a visit. The big event of the year is the annual Bakewell Show, which takes place the first Wednesday and Thursday in August and attracts farmers and many others from all over the Peak District and surrounding area.

Bakewell from the river
Bakewell from the river
There are some very pleasant walks along the river from the bridge in the centre of town. Downstream leads to the recreation ground and upstream takes you to the site of Arkwright's mill, via Holme Hall (a fortified manor house dated 1626) and Holme Bridge (dated 1664). The mill burned down in 1868, but the cottages associated with it (Lumford Terrace), still survive.

Bakewell has a full range of shops, pubs and restaurants. There are numerous options for accommodation and there is also a Youth Hostel.

Bakewell has an annual well dressing and carnival, held in late June and it is the home of the Peak District National Park Authority, who have their main offices at Aldern House, Baslow Road. They also operate the town's information centre which is in the old Market Hall in Bridge street, with a parking area (except on market days) and public toilets next to it. It is open daily 9.30am - 5.30pm in summer and 9.30am - 1pm in winter. Telephone: 01629 813227
 
Bakewell Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bakewell Church
0 - Bakewell Church
Bakewell Church - Norman north door
1 - Bakewell Church - Norman north door
Bakewell Church - Saxon stone fragments
2 - Bakewell Church - Saxon stone fragments
Bakewell Church - medieval coffin lids
3 - Bakewell Church - medieval coffin lids
Bakewell Church - Norman font
4 - Bakewell Church - Norman font
Bakewell Church - Foljambe monument
5 - Bakewell Church - Foljambe monument
Bakewell Church - Tomb of Sir Thomas Wendesley
6 - Bakewell Church - Tomb of Sir Thomas Wendesley
Bakewell Church - Saxon cross stump
7 - Bakewell Church - Saxon cross stump
Bakewell - view of the town from the riverside
8 - Bakewell - view of the town from the riverside
Bakewell livestock market
9 - Bakewell livestock market
Bakewell bridge over the River Wye
10 - Bakewell bridge over the River Wye
Bakewell Church - Saxon Cross
11 - Bakewell Church - Saxon Cross
Bakewell Church - medieval stone graves
12 - Bakewell Church - medieval stone graves
Bakewell - Old house museum
13 - Bakewell - Old house museum
Bakewell - view of the church and the town
14 - Bakewell - view of the church and the town

Beeley

Slideshow

Beeley is one of the Chatsworth estate villages. Now bypassed by the road into Chatsworth, until the late 1700s it was a through route for traffic traveling to and from the estate. Following the construction of the new road it exists as a tranquil, set-back village with a group of cul-de-sacs with cottages constructed of honey-coloured gritstone, quarried from Fallinge Edge above. There is a nice pub, which is unsurprisingly called the Devonshire Arms, a free public car park opposite. The church has a Norman doorway and a 16th century tower but was over-restored by zealous Victorians. The church also has a fine, ancient specimen yew in the churchyard, thought to predate the church itself. There is also an excellent cafe and wholefoods shop called The Old Smithy located just up from the pub.

Beeley Moor, high to the east of the village, is a fine open, wild area with good walking and occasional views of Chatsworth Park. This area was heavily populated in the Bronze Age and the moor is dotted with hut circles and tumuli, the most celebrated of which is Hob Hurst's House - an unusual square tumulus which is a scheduled national monument. At one time Beeley grit was famous for being especially hard and was used to make grindstones, but this trade has long ceased.

Travelling north, you soon arrive at the boundary of Chatsworth Park. The road crosses the Derwent into the park on Beeley Bridge, which was constructed in 1761 and is a fine example of an 18th century bridge.
 
Beeley Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge
Chatsworth - the Emperor fountain
0 - Chatsworth - the Emperor fountain

Birchover

Slideshow

Birchover is larger than first appears, with rows of cottages clustered along a road which heads straight up the hillside to the historically significant Stanton Moor. It is a very good centre for exploring both Stanton Moor and Harthill Moor on the opposite side of the valley.

At the bottom of the village is the Druid Inn and there is a church hidden in a hollow below it. The church has some unusual paintings which seem more appropriate to the namesakes of the Inn than a church. Behind the Druid Inn is Rowtor Rocks, a small gritstone tor with a fine view similar to the better-known Robin Hood's Stride across the valley from it. It contains several finely balanced rocking stones which can be moved by the application of a shoulder. One of these could once be moved easily by hand, but was shifted from its position as a prank by fourteen young men on Whit Sunday 1799 and although it was replaced it is not now so finely balanced. The steps and seats which are carved out of the rock here were the work of the Reverend Thomas Eyre, the builder of the village church.

At the top of the village there is an active and important stone-cutting works and behind this are quarries where high-quality gritstone is extracted for building purposes.
 
Birchover Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
0 - Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
1 - Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
2 - Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
Robin Hoods Stride
3 - Robin Hoods Stride
Stanton Moor - the Andle Stone with Youlgrave behind
4 - Stanton Moor - the Andle Stone with Youlgrave behind
Birchover view
5 - Birchover view
Cratcliffe Tor
6 - Cratcliffe Tor
Winster - Old Market Hall
7 - Winster - Old Market Hall
Winster Dower House
8 - Winster Dower House
Winster Hall
9 - Winster Hall
Winster street
10 - Winster street

Bonsall

Slideshow

After the bustle and noise of Matlock Bath it comes as a surprise to find just over the hill a peaceful village like Bonsall nestling in a deep dale. Bonsall is a village of many parts; The steep road up from the Via Gellia is called The Clatterway. At the village green The Dale splits off to the left while the High Street carries on all the way to Town Head. Between Town Head and The Dale is Uppertown while just along from The Dale is the hamlet of Slaley.

Bonsall has a long lead-mining heritage and once boasted five pubs. The moor above is pock-marked with the remains of lead-mines and the village comprises mainly small lead-miners and weavers cottages.

At the centre of the village is an old market cross on a circular base of steps outside one of the two remaining pubs, The King's Head, dating from 1677. Just along church lane is the Victorian church, which overlooks the village. Over in The Dale is the other remaining pub, The Barley Mow, which hosts the annual Bonsall Chicken Race on the first Saturday in August.
 
Bonsall Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Matlock Bath - The Pavilion
0 - Matlock Bath - The Pavilion
Bonsall Market square
1 - Bonsall Market square
Cromford - Scarthin and millpond
2 - Cromford - Scarthin and millpond
Matlock Bath
3 - Matlock Bath
Matlock Bath from above the Temple Hotel
4 - Matlock Bath from above the Temple Hotel
River Derwent at Matlock Bath
5 - River Derwent at Matlock Bath
Middleton by Wirksworth cottages
6 - Middleton by Wirksworth cottages

Darley Dale

Slideshow

Darley Dale is a long, drawn out Derwent Valley settlement that lies A6 to the north-west of Matlock. It is principally residential now but was the location of the Mill Close Mine - the last major lead mine in the Peak, which closed in 1939. Now there is a lead smelter on the site. Largely ignored by the traffic passing through it nonetheless has some very interesting nooks and crannies. The old town is down and to the west of the road towards the river and the parish church has a Norman font and a very old and impressive yew tree with a 33-foot girth. The tree is claimed to be over 2,000 years old. On the main A6 road above the church is the Whitworth Institute, founded by Sir Joseph Whitworth, a local industrialist and local benefactor.

Either side of Darley Dale there are excellent walking prospects and scenery. To the West is Stanton Moor with both ancient and industrial heritage while to the east is the much quieter Fallinge Edge, now largely accessible thanks to the CROW act. Both Stanton and Fallinge are gritstone and sport incredible heather in late July and August.
 
Darley Dale Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Restaurant car at Peak Rail
0 - Restaurant car at Peak Rail
Peak Rail engine
1 - Peak Rail engine

Elton

Slideshow

Elton is a pretty village constructed of a warm-coloured local sandstone. It is situated on the hillside looking down towards Youlgreave and Stanton-in-the-Peak and the views from nearby Blake Low are particularly fine. Robin Hood's Stride and Cratcliff Tor are within easy walking distance.

The village is situated just off the Iron Age road known as The Portway, and that and the presence of local springs probably accounts for its existence here, placed high on the hillside in an otherwise exposed position. It was a lead-mining centre in the 18th and 19th centuries and the church, which dates from 1812, replaced an earlier building which collapsed in 1805 due to mining subsidence.

At the village centre there is a pub and a cafe, while further along the main street there is a the former Elton Hall which until recently was a Youth Hostel.
 
Elton Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
0 - Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
Robin Hoods Stride
1 - Robin Hoods Stride
Birchover view
2 - Birchover view
Cratcliffe Tor
3 - Cratcliffe Tor
Elton cafe
4 - Elton cafe

Grangemill & Ible

Grangemill is situated at a crossroads on the Via Gellia, the A5012 road from Cromford to Buxton. There are a few houses, the former mill, and a pub called the Hollybush.

Ible is situated on the hilltop just to the east. Relatively untouched and untroubled, it is one of the Peak's best hidden little hamlets, with a small cluster of farms on a bluff overlooking the Griffe Grange Valley below.
 

Matlock

Slideshow

Matlock, the county town of Derbyshire, is a former spa town situated at a sharp bend in the River Derwent, where it turns south to carve its way through the ridge of limestone which bars its route towards Derby. Just downriver of the main town lies Matlock Bath, which is enclosed by the limestone cliffs of the gorge and contains the main tourist attractions of the locality.

Matlock church at Matlock Town
Matlock church at Matlock Town
In many respects Matlock seems quite a new town, certainly when compared with Buxton or Bakewell for instance. The reason is that Matlock was an unimportant collection of small villages centred around the church until thermal springs were discovered in 1698. Even this did not lead to an immediate development of Matlock because the route down the Derwent was blocked by Willersley crags at Cromford, so the road to Matlock from the south arrived by a circuitous and hilly route.

Matlock Bath
Matlock Bath
This situation was remedied by the cutting of the road through Scarthin Nick near Cromford in 1818, though Matlock had already begun to gain a reputation as a rather select spa by then. The Victorian era saw the development of Matlock Bath as a fashionable resort and the construction by John Smedley in 1853 of the vast Hydro on the steep hill to the north of the river crossing at the centre of the town. This enormous hotel functioned as a spa until the 1950s, when it closed and was taken over by Derbyshire County Council as its headquarters.

The coming of the railways in the 1870s transformed Matlock again, this time into a resort for day-trippers from the Derby-Nottingham area and further south. From then on Matlock spawned tourist attractions in the form of show caverns, cable railways, petrifying wells, pleasure gardens and even recently a theme park. The evidence of the change which came over the place can be seen best at Matlock Bath, where the amusement arcades along the main road provide a sharp contrast with the elegant Victorian villas above.

Matlock Bath from High Tor
Matlock Bath from High Tor
The modern town is divided neatly into two: the main town radiating out from the river crossing opposite the railway station and Matlock Bath spread out along the gorge to the south. Whereas Matlock itself seems solid and Victorian with neat stone houses going in rows up the hill, the Bath has a more frivolous air. Overlooking it all is the gigantic folly that is Riber Castle, built in the 1860s by the same John Smedley who constructed the Hydro.

The town has a full range of shops and facilities, however the principal hotels are both in the Bath - the New Bath Hotel is out on the road to Cromford opposite Wildcat crags and the Temple Hotel is on the hill below the Heights of Abraham. The Grand Pavilion at Matlock Bath is a pleasure palace built in 1910 alongside the River Derwent. It houses the Peak District Lead Mining Museum and has recently been purchased by the community after years of neglect. There are plans to refurbish it with a Heritage Lottery Fund grant as a theatre and venue.

The tourist information centre is now at the Peak Rail

shop on Matlock Station. The telephone number is 01335 343666.
 
Matlock Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Richard Arkwright
0 - Richard Arkwright
Matlock Bath - The Pavilion
1 - Matlock Bath - The Pavilion
High Tor
2 - High Tor
Bonsall Market square
3 - Bonsall Market square
Cromford - the Greyhound Inn
4 - Cromford - the Greyhound Inn
Cromford Canal and Wharf
5 - Cromford Canal and Wharf
Cromford - Scarthin and millpond
6 - Cromford - Scarthin and millpond
High Tor and Riber Castle from across the valley
7 - High Tor and Riber Castle from across the valley
Matlock Bath and High Tor
8 - Matlock Bath and High Tor
Matlock view
9 - Matlock view
Matlock Bath
10 - Matlock Bath
Matlock church
11 - Matlock church
Matlock - Riber Hall
12 - Matlock - Riber Hall
Cromford - Willersley Castle
13 - Cromford - Willersley Castle
The cable railway to Heights of Abraham
14 - The cable railway to Heights of Abraham
Cotton Doubling machine at Masson Mills
15 - Cotton Doubling machine at Masson Mills
Masson Mills
16 - Masson Mills
Matlock Bath from High Tor
17 - Matlock Bath from High Tor
Matlock from High Tor
18 - Matlock from High Tor
On Giddy Ledge, High Tor
19 - On Giddy Ledge, High Tor
Matlock Bath from above the Temple Hotel
20 - Matlock Bath from above the Temple Hotel
River Derwent at Matlock Bath
21 - River Derwent at Matlock Bath

Middleton by Youlgreave

Slideshow

Middleton cottages
Middleton cottages
Middleton by Youlgreave is a quiet, leafy place built above the River Bradford, upstream of its larger neighbour. There was once a castle here, a fact commemorated in the name of Castle Farm, but the modern village was mostly constructed in the 19th century around the hall, which is hidden behind trees at the southern end of the village.

The most notable feature of the village is the grave of Thomas Bateman (1820-61), an important local archaeologist and excavator of some 500 local barrows. Though he took some care to record and analyse his finds, his methods were unfortunately not nearly as scientific as modern techniques, and he was known to have excavated as many as five barrows in one day. Many of his finds are now in Sheffield Museum, and some in the British Museum. He is buried in a field behind the former Congregational chapel, in a small enclosure surrounded by cast-iron railings. A barrow would perhaps have been more appropriate.

On the village green there is a playground and public toilets, and alongside there is a more recent memorial to the crew of a Lancaster bomber which crashed at nearby Smerrill in 1944.

The walking around Middleton is excellent. Bradford Dale is beautiful and the high, limestone pasturelands around the village harbour much archaeology, both ancient and industrial.
 
Middleton by Youlgreave Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Youlgrave church - exterior view
0 - Youlgrave church - exterior view
Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
1 - Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
2 - Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
3 - Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
4 - Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
Bradford Dale
5 - Bradford Dale
Middleton by Youlgrave - Thomas Bateman\'s tomb
6 - Middleton by Youlgrave - Thomas Bateman\'s tomb
Fluorspar workings on Long Rake
7 - Fluorspar workings on Long Rake
Middleton by Youlgrave
8 - Middleton by Youlgrave
Over Haddon stile
9 - Over Haddon stile
Youlgrave YHA
10 - Youlgrave YHA
Youlgrave water cistern
11 - Youlgrave water cistern
Youlgrave public house
12 - Youlgrave public house

Over Haddon

Slideshow

Over Haddon is a picturesque former lead-mining village clinging to the top of the steep side of Lathkill Dale to the south of Bakewell. It is a popular stopping point for weekend walkers in the Lathkill valley and has a useful car park, though using this does involve a steep descent (and thus ascent) into (and out of) Lathkill Dale below. The village has a pub called The Lathkill.

Lathkill Dale is a beautiful and fascinating place. An alternative perspective can be achieved by following the gorge top access land from the access point to the south of Haddon Grove Farm, one mile to the west of Over Haddon.
 
Over Haddon Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Lathkill Dale - the remains of the aqueduct from Mandale Mine
0 - Lathkill Dale - the remains of the aqueduct from Mandale Mine
Lathkill River
1 - Lathkill River
Conksbury Bridge
2 - Conksbury Bridge
Over Haddon village
3 - Over Haddon village
Over Haddon stile
4 - Over Haddon stile
Mandale Mine engine house
5 - Mandale Mine engine house
Mandale Mine buildings
6 - Mandale Mine buildings

Rowsley

Slideshow

Rowsley lies at the junction of the Wye and Derwent rivers and is bisected by the main road, the A6. The village is in two sections - the original village lies in the 'Y' between the two rivers while to the east is the so-called 'railway village' constructed around the former Midland railway station. The two sections form an interesting contrast - the old part is made of gritstone cottages and farmhouses and has connections with nearby Haddon and Chatsworth, while the newer part is more utilitarian.

Peacock Hotel Rowsley
Peacock Hotel Rowsley
Two buildings in Rowsley are of interest. One is the Peacock Hotel on the main road. Built in 1652 by a John Stevenson who was agent to Grace, Lady Manners, this was at one time a dower house of Haddon Hall and is a very fine building. Above the entrance there is a magnificent ceramic peacock (the emblem of the Manners family), made by Mintons of Stoke-on-Trent. The second interesting building is Caudwell's mill, which lies off the A6 to the south, and is a fine example of a working 19th century mill. The outbuildings in the grounds of the mill house a number of different art and artisan workshops as well as an excellent cafe.

In the old village there is a Victorian church just to the north of the old railway line. Over the bridge across the Derwent there is a second pub and a small 'shopping village' behind it.
 
Rowsley Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Caudwells Mill
0 - Caudwells Mill
Rowsley - the Peacock Hotel
1 - Rowsley - the Peacock Hotel
Restaurant car at Peak Rail
2 - Restaurant car at Peak Rail
Peak Rail engine
3 - Peak Rail engine

Stanton in the Peak

Slideshow

Stanton-in-the-Peak is an estate village mostly constructed by the Thornhill family during the 18th and 19th centuries. Stanton Hall lies well hidden just to the south of the village, much of which is pleasingly built around stone courtyards and alleyways. The village faces west and catches the afternoon and evening sun all year. It is a fine vantage point from which to view the Wye valley, with Haddon Hall in clear view.

The church is an imposing building dating from the 1830s. The village pub is called The Flying Childers, named after an otherwise long-forgotten race-horse. The main interest around here lies above the village on Stanton Moor, with its stone circles, standing stones and Bronze Age enclosures plus fine views across the Derwent valley.

Stanton Lees is a small hamlet on the east side of Stanton Moor with a spectacular view across Darley Dale and the Derwent Valley.


 
Stanton in the Peak Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
0 - Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
1 - Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
2 - Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
Caudwells Mill
3 - Caudwells Mill
Stanton Moor - the Andle Stone with Youlgrave behind
4 - Stanton Moor - the Andle Stone with Youlgrave behind
Cratcliffe Tor
5 - Cratcliffe Tor
Rowsley - the Peacock Hotel
6 - Rowsley - the Peacock Hotel

Wensley

Slideshow

Wensley is a small village of former lead-miners' cottages which overlooks the Derwent Valley above Darley Dale. It provides good access to the beautiful Clough Wood and Cambridge Wood and from there to Stanton Moor. Deer are frequently seen around this area. There is a pub here.
 
Wensley Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
0 - Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
1 - Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle

Winster

Slideshow

Winster Market Hall
Winster Market Hall
Winster is one of the oldest and most picturesque villages in the Peak and was once the centre of the local lead mining industry. It is named after Wynn's Tor, an outcrop of rock on the edge of Bonsall Moor above it. In the 18th century this was a thriving and prosperous centre and acquired some fine buildings which remain to attest to this short period of importance. Chief of these are Winster Hall, which stands half-way along the main street, and the Dower House, which is in front of the church.
Dower House
Dower House
Its most conspicuous landmark is the old Market Hall, which stands in the centre of the main street and was constructed in the 16th and 17th centuries. It is a unique building and was the first property in this area to be acquired by the National Trust.

The village still has the feel of a lead-mining centre, with rows of former miners' cottages clinging to the slope of the north side of the hill. There are shops and a pub called the Bowling Green, which bears the date 1473 though the present building is much newer. Outside the village proper to the south is the Miners' Standard, a well-known former miners' pub and just up the hill from this there is an unusual building which was once used for storing lead ore.

Parking in Winster can be a bit tricky if you are planning to use it as a base from which to explore the area and it is best to park in the vicinity of the Miners' Standard rather than the Main Street
 
Winster Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Robin Hoods Stride
0 - Robin Hoods Stride
Birchover view
1 - Birchover view
Cratcliffe Tor
2 - Cratcliffe Tor
Elton cafe
3 - Elton cafe
Winster - Old Market Hall
4 - Winster - Old Market Hall
Winster Dower House
5 - Winster Dower House
Winster Hall
6 - Winster Hall
Winster street
7 - Winster street

Youlgrave

Slideshow

Youlgrave (or Youlgreave as the Ordnance Survey persist in calling it) is a sleepy village. Now mainly devoted to farming it was once one of the centres of the Derbyshire lead-mining industry. Though lead is no longer mined some of the old mines are still used for the extraction of fluorspar and calcite but this is low-level and unobtrusive.

Youlgrave Church
Youlgrave Church
The village was built on a ridge between the rivers Bradford and Lathkill, and is a fine centre for exploring both of these beautiful valleys. The village spills down the slope to the Bradford to the south in a topsy-turvy fashion. The river is often dry here in summer, having found an underground course to the Derwent at Darley Dale in 1881, but the dale upstream is very pretty.

At the crossroads at the eastern end of the village lie the George Hotel and the church and from here the main road goes westwards past rows of old cottages.
Conduit Head
Conduit Head
There are several shops and a second pub before you reach the former Market Place where the main feature is the Conduit Head, a large circular tank which was once an integral part of the village's water supply. Opposite, the former Co-op building now houses the Youth Hostel.

The church is one of the most interesting in the Peak, and the village contains many rows of lovely old cottages. Behind the Market Place is the original Hall, now Old Hall Farm, a grand building dated 1630, and there are some fine buildings along the main street.

Downstream of Youlgreave the hamlet of Alport lies at the junction of the Lathkill and Bradford rivers. It is a pretty spot and a good place to start a circular walk of the two valleys.
 
Youlgrave Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Youlgrave church - exterior view
0 - Youlgrave church - exterior view
Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
1 - Harthill Moor - The Nine Stones
Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
2 - Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
3 - Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
4 - Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
5 - Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
Lathkill Dale - the remains of the aqueduct from Mandale Mine
6 - Lathkill Dale - the remains of the aqueduct from Mandale Mine
Bradford Dale
7 - Bradford Dale
Conksbury Bridge
8 - Conksbury Bridge
Middleton by Youlgrave - Thomas Bateman\'s tomb
9 - Middleton by Youlgrave - Thomas Bateman\'s tomb
Cratcliffe Tor
10 - Cratcliffe Tor
Fluorspar workings on Long Rake
11 - Fluorspar workings on Long Rake
Middleton by Youlgrave
12 - Middleton by Youlgrave
Over Haddon village
13 - Over Haddon village
Over Haddon stile
14 - Over Haddon stile
Youlgrave YHA
15 - Youlgrave YHA
Youlgrave water cistern
16 - Youlgrave water cistern
Youlgrave public house
17 - Youlgrave public house
Mandale Mine engine house
18 - Mandale Mine engine house
Mandale Mine buildings
19 - Mandale Mine buildings

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