Bakewell: Tourist Attractions and Places to Visit in the Peak District - Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire

A directory of tourist and visitor attractions near Bakewell in the Peak District area of Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire and Yorkshire. Historic houses, churches, dams and reservoirs, theme parks, museums, railways and castles

Visitor Attractions around Bakewell

historic interest

 Bakewell Church

Slideshow

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Bakewell Church
Bakewell Church
Saxon Cross
Saxon Cross
There was a Saxon church in Bakewell in 920 and the churchyard is home to two 9th century Saxon crosses - a large somewhat damaged one in an enclosure on the north-east side of the church and a smaller, better preserved stump (which was found at a local farm and re-sited here) just to the east of the entrance. In and around the church porch there are many fine carved fragments of Saxon stonework found during restoration work in the 1840s and some ancient stone coffins.

The present church was started in late Norman style in the 12th century but only the West front and part of the North and South arcades of the nave survive from this period; the rest was built from 1220-40, with the spire added in 1340. A drastic renovation in the 1840s was almost a rebuilding - the spire, which was in danger of collapse, was completely rebuilt along with the central portion of the church.
Stone coffins
Stone coffins


Bakewell was the town of the Vernon (and later the Manners) family and the church has some interesting relics of them, plus a fine 14th century font.

In the Vernon Chapel off the South aisle there are some magnificent tombs: that of Sir Thomas Wendesley, who was killed in the battle of Shrewsbury in 1403;
Tomb of Sir Thomas Wendesley
Tomb of Sir Thomas Wendesley
of John Vernon of Haddon Hall, who died in 1477; and of Sir George Vernon and his two wives.

Sir George, who was known as the 'King of the Peak', died in 1567, but his chief claim to fame is now as the father of Dorothy Vernon, who famously eloped from Haddon Hall with Sir John Manners - they also have a monument at the South end of the chapel, while at the opposite end there is a monument to their son, George Manners and his wife Grace. Outside the chapel is a much smaller but very beautiful monument: - that of Sir John Foljambe (died 1377) and his wife, carved in alabaster.
 
Bakewell Church Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bakewell Church
0 - Bakewell Church
Bakewell - view of the church and the town
1 - Bakewell - view of the church and the town
Bakewell Church - Norman north door
2 - Bakewell Church - Norman north door
Bakewell Church - medieval stone graves
3 - Bakewell Church - medieval stone graves
Bakewell Church - medieval coffin lids
4 - Bakewell Church - medieval coffin lids
Bakewell Church - Saxon cross stump
5 - Bakewell Church - Saxon cross stump
Bakewell Church - Saxon Cross
6 - Bakewell Church - Saxon Cross
Bakewell Church - Norman font
7 - Bakewell Church - Norman font
Bakewell Church - Foljambe monument
8 - Bakewell Church - Foljambe monument
Bakewell Church - Tomb of Sir Thomas Wendesley
9 - Bakewell Church - Tomb of Sir Thomas Wendesley

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK216685


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
the church lies just above the centre of Bakewell, which lies on the A6 Derby-Manchester road between Matlock and Buxton. Parking in the centre of Bakewell can often be problematic.

By Bus: the Trans-Peak bus from Derby to Manchester goes through the town. The X18 and 240 buses from Sheffield and the 170 bus from Chesterfield also go to Bakewell.
When is it open?

Normally open in daytime.
What does it cost?

No charge.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

historic interest

 Caudwell's Mill, Rowsley

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There has been a mill on the site of Caudwell's Mill at Rowsley for centuries, but the present building was constructed in 1874, by John Cauldwell. The mill was built for flour milling and continued in this as a family business until 1978, when it closed down. The mill is now owned and operated by Caudwells's Mill Trust Ltd and still mills flour - the last in the area to do so.

Caudwells Mill
Caudwells Mill
The mill is an excellent example of a working 19th century mill, with water turbines powering the machinery. On the ground floor are roller mills (which replaced millstones here in 1885), and bagging equipment, plus a small shop at which samples of flour may be purchased. On the floors above are storage bins for the wheat, purifiers to separate out bran and sifters for grading the flour. Everything is in working order and the tour takes in all areas of the mill.

In the outbuildings of the mill there is a mill shop selling flour and a small craft centre, including an artist's studio, and workshops for glass-blowing, ceramics and woodturning. There is an excellent (and cheap) coffee shop with good vegetarian food.
 
Caudwell's Mill, Rowsley Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge
Caudwells Mill
0 - Caudwells Mill

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK255657


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How to get there

By Road:
Rowsley is on the A6 between Bakewell and Matlock. To reach from Chesterfield take the A619 to Baslow and the B6012 through Chatsworth Park. From Sheffield, take the A621 to Baslow followed by the B6012.

By Bus: The Trans - Peak Manchester to Derby bus goes through Rowsley and stops close to the mill.
When is it open?

Opening times for the mill are: Open every day 10am to 5pm, last entrance 4.15pm. The shop is open every day from 9am to 5pm.
What does it cost?

Admission 4.50 for adults, 3.50 for senior citizens and 2.00 for children aged 5-15 (Children must be accompanied). Under 5s FREE.

Conducted and pre-booked parties can be accommodated at any time of the year, by arrangement (phone 01629 734374

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.caudwellsmill.co.uk/

historic interestgood for childrengood for exercisegood scenery

 Chatsworth House and Park

Slideshow
360 degree view
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Chatsworth House from across the Park
Chatsworth House from across the Park
When you drive across the surrounding park and see Chatsworth House for the first time, a sumptuous pile of yellow stone surrounded by gardens, fronted by the River Derwent and backed by a tree-covered hillside, it fairly takes your breath away. It is not hard to see why this is the premier tourist attraction of the area.

The stables
The stables


The house and the estate surrounding it have been the home of the Cavendish family for almost 500 years. The original house here was the work of Sir William Cavendish and his third wife Bess of Hardwick in the mid 16th Century. Sir William was a Crown Commissioner responsible for dissolving monasteries and his reward was a gift of land here. Sir William died in 1557 with the house partly constructed and Bess, who was a formidable woman, completed a house with a central courtyard and four corner towers, facing east towards the hillside. No trace of this can now be seen, but the modern house retains many of the Elizabethan interior walls and the Huntingtower on the hill above the house dates from the 1580s.

Statues in the gardens
Statues in the gardens


William and Bess's son, also called William Cavendish, was created first Earl of Devonshire in 1618 and in 1694 the fourth Earl was created the first Duke of Devonshire - partly as a reward for supporting the Glorious Revolution. The first Duke rebuilt Chatsworth in Classical style between 1686 and 1707, using an obscure Dutch architect called William Talman. He later fired Talman and the house was completed by Thomas Archer.

The Library and North Wing were added by the 6th Duke between 1790 and 1858, the work of Wyatville, and the stables and bridges over the River Derwent were added in the 18th century by Paine. The park was landscaped by the 4th Duke (1720-1764), who engaged 'Capability' Brown to reshape the formal garden into the more natural one you see today.

The Huntingtower
The Huntingtower
The 6th Duke engaged Joseph Paxton as the head gardener at the age of 23, resulting in the enrichment of the gardens and the creation of the Emperor Fountain (to impress the Czar of Russia when he visited) as well as the Great Conservatory. Paxton worked at Chatsworth the rest of his life, staying for 32 years. The house and gardens have remained little changed since this time, the only major exception being the demolition of the Great Conservatory and its replacement by a maze.

Many famous people have come to Chatsworth, some to stay and others to live there. Among the most famous are Mary Queen of Scots, who was here as a guest and prisoner of Bess of Hardwick and her fourth husband, the Earl of Shrewsbury, between 1573 and 1582. Another was Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, who lived here in a famous 'menage a trois' with the 5th Duke and Lady Elizabeth Foster in the late 18th century.

The house itself is magnificent, if a little overwhelming, but the gardens are a treat, and the surrounding park is a superb area of open space with fine scenery, woods and views of the house and surrounding area - an excellent place for relatively gentle walks.

There is also a farmyard behind the house, where typical farm animals can be seen in context; with milking demonstrations and other insights into life on a farm for both the people and the animals. Next to the farmyard there is a small adventure playground - both this and the farmyard are great for kids.
 
Chatsworth House and Park Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Chatsworth - view across the park
0 - Chatsworth - view across the park
Chatsworth House
1 - Chatsworth House
Chatsworth - view across the Derwent
2 - Chatsworth - view across the Derwent
Chatsworth Park - the bridge over the River Derwent
3 - Chatsworth Park - the bridge over the River Derwent
Chatsworth - the house seen from the park
4 - Chatsworth - the house seen from the park
Chatsworth - east facade
5 - Chatsworth - east facade
Chatsworth - the stables
6 - Chatsworth - the stables
Chatsworth - Tiepolo ceiling in the house
7 - Chatsworth - Tiepolo ceiling in the house
Chatsworth House - the dining room
8 - Chatsworth House - the dining room
Chatsworth - the house viewed from the gardens
9 - Chatsworth - the house viewed from the gardens
Chatsworth - the Canal Pond and Emperor Fountain
10 - Chatsworth - the Canal Pond and Emperor Fountain
Chatsworth - the Emperor fountain
11 - Chatsworth - the Emperor fountain
Chatsworth - the maze in the gardens
12 - Chatsworth - the maze in the gardens
Chatsworth - the 'grotto' in the gardens
13 - Chatsworth - the 'grotto' in the gardens
Chatsworth - the cascade in the gardens
14 - Chatsworth - the cascade in the gardens
Chatsworth - garden statues
15 - Chatsworth - garden statues
Chatsworth - the hothouses in the gardens
16 - Chatsworth - the hothouses in the gardens
Chatsworth - the Huntingtower
17 - Chatsworth - the Huntingtower

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK262702


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How to get there

By Road:
The B6102 Baslow to Rowsley road goes through Chatsworth Park. To reach Baslow take the A619 Bakewell - Chesterfield road or the A623 Chapel-en-le-Frith to Chesterfield road. Rowsley lies on the A6 between Bakewell and Matlock. Car parking is provided alongside the house at a charge of £5.00. There is also parking at Calton Lees at the south end of the park (about 1 mile or 1.5 km from the house, but a very pleasant walk across the park). This costs £3.00

By Bus: The 214 Wirksworth - Sheffield bus comes directly to the door. The 170 Bakewell bus from Chesterfield will bring you to Baslow (at least - from Baslow it is a pleasant walk through the park of about 2km) and alternate buses go directly to Chatsworth. For access from Derby or Buxton/Manchester take the Trans Peak Derby->Bakewell->Buxton->Manchester bus and change to the 214 bus in Darley Dale.

By Train: The nearest railway stations are Chesterfield (trains from Sheffield or London) or Matlock (trains from Derby).
When is it open?

The house, garden and farmyard are open from 25th March - 10th November. The 1000 acre park and the farmshop and its restaurant are open all year round.

House 11.0am (10.30am in peak season) to 5.30pm, last admission 4.00pm.

Garden 11.00am (10.30am in peak season) to 6.00pm, last admission 5.00pm.

Farmyard and adventure playground 10.30am to 5.30pm, last admission 4.30pm.

All the above are open from 11th November 2017 - 5th January 2018 with similar hours.
What does it cost?

Complete Ticket: Unlimited entry to the house, garden, farmyard & adventure playground, plus a half price return visit, valid for one use on or before 3 November 2017: Adult £21.90, child £14, family 2+3 £60.90.

House and Garden ticket: Adult £19.90, child £12.00, family 2+3 £54.90.

Garden only: Adult £12.90, Child £7.00, Family 2+3 £34.90,

Farmyard and adventure playground - Adult/Senior/Student/Child £6.00, Family 2+3 £22.00.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.chatsworth.org

historic interest

 Haddon Hall

Slideshow

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The main house entrance
The main house entrance
Banqueting Hall
Banqueting Hall
Haddon Hall is the finest example of a medieval manor house currently in existence in England. The hall is one of the seats of the Dukes of Rutland and lies alongside the River Wye, just south of Bakewell.

The manor of Haddon was originally in the hands of the Peveril family (just after the Norman Conquest), but was forfeited to the Crown in 1153. It then passed to a tenant of the Peverils, William Avenal, and was acquired in 1170 by Richard Vernon, who had married Avenal's daughter. The Vernons were responsible for most of the buildings at Haddon Hall, apart from the Peveril Tower and part of the Chapel, which were already there in 1170. The Long Gallery is the only significant part which was added later.

In 1563 the heir to the manor, Dorothy Vernon, married (or as local legend says - eloped with) John Manners and the Hall has been in the hands of the Manners family ever since. It's interesting to note that the Hall has never been bought or sold.

The Manners family became the Earls, later Dukes, of Rutland and they moved their main seat to Belvoir Castle, using the hall very little in the 18th and 19th centuries. The result was that it was almost unaltered since the end of the 16th century when the 9th Duke realised its importance and began restoration after moving there in 1912.

The house is in a beautiful situation and is very well preserved - even down to kitchens straight from the 17th century - so it looks magnificent.

The entrance courtyard still looks perfectly medieval, with gargoyles and crenelated walls.

To the right hand side of the courtyard lies the Hall chapel, which looks much as it did in medieval times, and contains a beautiful carved alabaster retablo and pre-Reformation frescos which have been revealed from beneath the whitewash which hid them for centuries.

Altar Detail
Altar Detail
The Long Gallery
The Long Gallery
Entering the main house you soon come to the highlight of the visit - a glorious 14th Century Banqueting Hall complete with minstrels' gallery, which looks exactly as it must have done 600 years ago.

Next door there is the Dining Room - a fine oak paneled room with minature portraits of Henry VII and his Queen.

Beyond this lies a Tudor period Long Gallery, constructed around 1600. From the steps at the end of the Gallery Dorothy Vernon is said to have eloped with her lover, John Manners in 1558. These steps lead out into the gardens (which are very fine) and down to the River Wye.
 
Haddon Hall Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Haddon Hall - the Manners and Vernon symbols in topiary
0 - Haddon Hall - the Manners and Vernon symbols in topiary
Haddon Hall from the river
1 - Haddon Hall from the river
Haddon Hall - view from the hillside opposite
2 - Haddon Hall - view from the hillside opposite
Haddon Hall - entrance to the main house
3 - Haddon Hall - entrance to the main house
Haddon Hall gargoyle
4 - Haddon Hall gargoyle
Haddon Hall - chapel interior
5 - Haddon Hall - chapel interior
Haddon Hall - fresco in the chapel
6 - Haddon Hall - fresco in the chapel
Haddon Hall - fresco detail in the Chapel
7 - Haddon Hall - fresco detail in the Chapel
Haddon Hall - altar screen detail in the chapel
8 - Haddon Hall - altar screen detail in the chapel
Haddon Hall - Roman altar in the entrance
9 - Haddon Hall - Roman altar in the entrance
Haddon Hall - medieval Banqueting Hall
10 - Haddon Hall - medieval Banqueting Hall
Haddon Hall - in the kitchens
11 - Haddon Hall - in the kitchens
Haddon Hall - the butchers room
12 - Haddon Hall - the butchers room
Haddon Hall - carving of Henry VII in the dining room
13 - Haddon Hall - carving of Henry VII in the dining room
Haddon Hall - dining room
14 - Haddon Hall - dining room
Haddon Hall - the Long Gallery
15 - Haddon Hall - the Long Gallery
Haddon Hall gardens
16 - Haddon Hall gardens

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK224663


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How to get there

By Road:
The Hall lies just off the A6 and a car park is provided opposite the entrance to the Hall - price £2.50 per car. The A6 is a very busy road and crossing this can be a little difficult.

By Bus: The Trans-Peak bus between Derby->Matlock->Bakewell->Buxton->Manchester goes right past the door, as does the R61 Derby-Bakewell bus. From Sheffield take the 240 bus to Bakewell and then pick up the Trans-Peak or R61 to get to the Hall. From Chesterfield take the 170 bus to Bakewell and then as for Sheffield.

By Train: The nearest railway stations are Chesterfield (trains from Sheffield and London) or Matlock (trains from Derby).
When is it open?

Haddon Hall is open from 8th April to the end of September, Saturday-Monday in October. Closed after 1st November except 1st - 18th December.

Opening hours are from 10.30 am to 5.00 pm (last entrance at 4pm).
What does it cost?

Adult £13.50/ Concessions £13.00/ Children 5-16 £7.00 (Under 5 free) / Family (2 Adults 2 Children) £35.00/ Student £13.00 / Car Parking £2.50 per car. Regular Visitor passes are available at a discount.



Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.haddonhall.co.uk

historic interest

 Magpie Mine

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The Magpie Mine, just South of Sheldon, was one of the most famous lead mines in the Peak District and is the only one with a significant part of its building still standing, having been taken into the care of the Peak District Mines Historical Society in 1962. The mine buildings can be seen from the Bakewell - Chelmorton road.

The mine is at the junction of the Magpie vein, the Bole vein and the Butts vein, and was only one of several mines exploiting these veins - the Red Soil Mine and the Maypitts mine lay within only a few hundred metres of the Magpie. The mine is first recorded in 1795, though the workings are probably much older. It finally ceased operations in 1958, though the working in the 1950s mined little actual lead. The heyday of the mine was in the mid 19th Century.

Magpie Mine buildings
Magpie Mine buildings
The proximity of other mines often led to disputes, and the Magpie Mine and the Red Soil mine disputed the working of the Bole Vein on which they both lay. In 1833 this led to the deaths of 3 miners from the Red Soil Mine who were suffocated underground when the Magpie miners lit a fire to try to drive out the men from the opposing mine. Three miners were tried for murder, but acquitted. However, it was said afterwards that the Magpie was cursed and it never really prospered thereafter.

Lead-mining was a speculative business with big profits to be made sometimes and huge losses at others, so the mine changed hands frequently. Though the mine was very profitable in the early 1840s, it closed from 1846 to 1868, and when it was re-opened a large Cornish pumping engine was installed in the engine house which is now the major building on the site. However, water was a problem in this mine as in many others and when the price of lead fell the cost of pumping made the mine unprofitable and led the owners to consider driving a 'sough' or drainage tunnel from the River Wye into the mine workings.

Reconstruction of machinery at Magpie Mine
Reconstruction of machinery at Magpie Mine
The sough was built between 1873 and 1881 - an epic undertaking since the rock proved to be mostly 'toadstone', a variety of basalt, and very hard. It was the last major sough to be constructed in this area and is now one of the best preserved. The cost was 18,000, a very large sum for those days, and far more than the shareholders had budgeted for.

The sough enabled the mineshaft to be deepened to 728 feet, but despite this the mine never became profitable again and closed in 1883. It was worked again at intervals until 1923 and reopened in a limited way in the 1950s but only ever employed a few men and rarely made money.

The buildings still visible are enough to be able to construct a picture of what an 19th century leadmine must have looked like - except for the corrugated iron section which is a relic of the 1950s! Around the buildings there would also have been areas for crushing the ore and washing and dressing it prior to smelting.

Further Reading:

The best book is Lead Mining in the Peak District, Edited by Trevor D Ford & J H Rieuwerts, Published by the Peak Park Planning Board.

There are numerous other books on lead mining in this area, of which one is: Peakland Lead Mines and Miners, H M Parker & L M Willies, Moorland Publishing.
 
Magpie Mine Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Magpie Mine
0 - Magpie Mine
Magpie Mine
1 - Magpie Mine
Magpie Mine
2 - Magpie Mine

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK172682


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How to get there

By Road:
Take the Monyash road out of Bakewell and after about 3 km turn right on a minor road to Chelmorton. The mine buildings can be seen on the right after about 2km.
When is it open?

Entry to the mine area is not a right of way but access is not normally a problem and it is possible to walk up to the buildings and look around.


Website: http://www.pdmhs.org.uk

good for exercisegood scenery

 Monsal Head

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Monsal Head view of the railway viaduct
Monsal Head view of the railway viaduct
Monsal Head is a famous beauty spot with a magnificent view down Monsal Dale and up the Wye valley. The position is at a spot where the Wye, on its passage eastwards to meet the Derwent, encounters a band of harder rock and is forced to make a sharp turn southwards and carve its way through a high ridge of limestone. The view is spectacular, with the river far below, winding through a steep-sided and often rocky valley.

Looking up Monsal Dale
Looking up Monsal Dale
The route of the former Midland Railway makes its way along Monsal Dale and was carried by a viaduct over the river and into a tunnel which goes right beneath Monsal Head.

This is now part of the Monsal Trail, a popular route with walkers at weekends. The viaduct is now an accepted feature of the landscape, but when the railway was built in the 1870s, John Ruskin campaigned against the damage done to this unique environment, simply 'so that any fool from Bakewell can be in Buxton by lunchtime'.
 
Monsal Head Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Monsal Head Viaduct
0 - Monsal Head Viaduct
Monsal Dale
1 - Monsal Dale
Monsal Dale - river Wye
2 - Monsal Dale - river Wye

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK185715


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How to get there

By Road:
Monsal Head lies just off the B6465 road, which joins the A6 at Ashford with the A632 Chapel-en-le-Frith to Chesterfield road. There is a large public car park with public toilets behind the Monsal Head Hotel, which overlooks Monsal Dale. However this is a popular spot and the carpark is often full on summer weekends.

By Bus: the 27 bus from Bakewell to Tideswell passes Monsal Head.
When is it open?

Public land, no restrictions. Numerous footpaths around the dale.


historic interest

 Old House Museum, Bakewell


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Bakewell Old House Museum exterior
Bakewell Old House Museum exterior
The Old House Museum in Bakewell is about 200 metres away from the church, situated in the oldest standing building in Bakewell (dating from 1534). It houses a small exhibition of local life and artefacts, in 11 beamed rooms.

The building is a typical yeoman's house of the 16th century and belonged originally to the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield. At one time it was leased in 1777 by Richard Arkwright to house workers for the mill he built in the town. By 1935 the house was in a state of disrepair and was due to be demolished when it was saved by the Bakewell and District Historical Society and restored. The exterior is of local sandstone but the interior walls are of wattle and daub.


 

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK215685


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
the museum is close to the centre of Bakewell, which lies on the A6 Derby-Manchester road between Matlock and Buxton. Parking in the centre of Bakewell can often be problematic.

By Bus: the Trans-Peak bus from Derby to Manchester goes through the town. The X18 and 240 buses from Sheffield and the 170 bus from Chesterfield also go to Bakewell.
When is it open?

The museum is open 25th March to 5th November 11.00am - 4.00p
What does it cost?

Admission costs £4.50 for adults and £2.00 for children, £12.00 for a family ticket. Under 5s free

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.oldhousemuseum.org.uk/

historic interestgood for exercisegood scenery

 Stanton Moor

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Stanton Moor is in a fine position overlooking both the Derwent and Wye valleys. Possibly it is for this reason that it was chosen as a centre by the Bronze Age inhabitants of the area, who have left so many traces of their occupation upon the moor.

Nine Ladies stone circle
Nine Ladies stone circle
The moor contains at least 70 barrows as well as stone circles, ancient enclosures and standing stones and is of such interest to archaeologists that the whole area is now protected. However, don't go expecting anything on the scale of Stonehenge, or even Arbor Low - most of the monuments and remains are very small-scale and overgrown with heather.

The Cork Stone
The Cork Stone
The best known monument is the Nine Ladies Stone Circle, which lies at the centre of the moor - a low circle of worn gritstone blocks in a lovely location. Just to the south is a small standing stone - the King's Stone - and these are probably only a small part of what was once some sort of ceremonial area.

Most of the other famous stones around the moor are natural in origin - the Cat Stone, Cork Stone and Andle or Aingle Stone (which lies down to the west, below the moor) - but this has not prevented colourful legends accumulating about their origins or uses - mostly linking them with Druids, despite a complete lack of archaeological evidence.

The eastern edge of the moor is now owned by the National Trust, and includes a strange square gritstone tower which was raised as a monument to commemorate the first Great Reform Act of 1832.


 
Stanton Moor Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
0 - Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
1 - Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
Stanton Moor - the Andle Stone with Youlgrave behind
2 - Stanton Moor - the Andle Stone with Youlgrave behind

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK249634


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How to get there

By Road:
turn off the A6 between Bakewell and Rowsley onto the B5056 Ashbourne road and turn left where the road to Youlgrave forks off right. About 500m further on, turn left again, to Stanton in Peak. Follow the road through the village and take the second turn left to get onto the moor.

By Bus: the 172 bus runs from Bakewell to Stanton in Peak. From the village it is a brisk 1km (mostly uphill) walk onto the moor.
When is it open?

The moor is access land and there are no charges or restrictions.
What does it cost?

No charge

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

historic interest

 Youlgrave Church

Slideshow

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Youlgrave church
Youlgrave church
There are many fine churches in the Peak, but there are four that stand out from the rest. These are Tideswell, Bakewell, Hathersage and Youlgreave.

Youlgreave was in the Domesday Book, and the first mention of the church was in 1150, when it was given to St Mary's Abbey in Leicester. However, it is quite likely that there was a church here in Saxon times. The Nave and North Aisle of the church are Norman and date from 1150-1170, but the arches above are early Gothic and it seems likely that the church was altered and added to over a period of years, with several changes in style. It is possible to see this by viewing the wall of the North Aisle from the churchyard.

The chancel and South Aisle were added in the 14th century and the tower with its set of bells in the 15th century. The church was restored by Norman Shaw about 1870.

Inside the church there are two fine mediaeval tombs in the chancel. The first is that of Sir John Rossington, dating from the 13th century. He lies, cross-legged holding a heart in his hands with his feet resting on a dog. It is a simple and moving monument.

12th century pilgrim
12th century pilgrim
In the centre of the chancel is a later and more elaborate monument to Thomas Cockayne, a local man who was killed in brawl in 1488. He is represented in plate armour of the period, but the effigy is relatively small because he died before his father.

In the North Aisle there is an altar with a beautiful alabaster reredos which is a memorial to Robert Gilbert and his wife Joan, who died in 1492. This was originally part of a tomb in the South Aisle and has been moved at some time. The aisle is dominated by a Jacobean memorial to Roger Rooe of Alport, who died in 1613 and is shown facing his wife with their eight children below.

Just by the door as you enter is the font, which is Norman and very well-preserved. In the wall of the Nave, facing the door when you come in, there is a small carved figure which has been dated to the 12th century and which may represent a pilgrim. This is not its original position, and exactly what it represents is unclear, but it is very pretty.

There is a fine East window, made by William Morris to a design by Edward Burne-Jones, one of the Pre-Raphaelites. The roof of the Nave is well worth a look. It dates mainly from the 15th century, but was restored in the 19th century. It is a good example of a roof of the period and has roof bosses in the form of coats of arms and fantastic creatures.
 
Youlgrave Church Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Youlgrave church - exterior view
0 - Youlgrave church - exterior view
Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
1 - Youlgrave Church - medieval pilgrim figure
Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
2 - Youlgrave Church - tomb of Thomas Cokayne
Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
3 - Youlgrave Church - Roger Rooe tomb
Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert
4 - Youlgrave Church - memorial to Robert Gilbert

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK212643


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
from the A6 between Bakewell and Rowsley, take the B5056 signposted to Ashbourne, and when this forks left to cross the River Lathkill, continue straight on to Youlgrave. From the A515 Ashbourne - Buxton road, either take the minor road which branches off at Parsley Hey or the minor road which branches off the A5012 close to its junction with the A515.

By Bus: the 172 Bakewell - Matlock bus goes via Youlgrave, as well as the 171 Bakewell - Youlgrave service.
When is it open?

Normally open in day time.
What does it cost?

No charge.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

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