Glossop: Tourist Attractions and Places to Visit in the Peak District - Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire

A directory of tourist and visitor attractions near Glossop in the Peak District area of Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire and Yorkshire. Historic houses, churches, dams and reservoirs, theme parks, museums, railways and castles

Visitor Attractions around Glossop

good for exercisegood scenery

 Longendale Trail

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Sailing on Torside Reservoir
Sailing on Torside Reservoir
Woodhead Reservoir from the Trail
Woodhead Reservoir from the Trail
The Longendale Trail was opened in the early 1990s and follows the track of the former Woodhead railway from Hadfield to the entrance to the Woodhead tunnels, a distance of about 11km. It is a pleasant cycle ride or an easy walk, but there are few alternative return routes - the adjacent roads are not pleasant for cycling.

The trail starts just outside Hadfield station, not far from Bottoms Reservoir, and follows the chain of reservoirs up the valley. Along the way it offers fine views along Longendale and across to Black Hill.

There is a small car park in Hadfield and another at Torside, either of which would be convenient places to join the trail. The Peak National Park maintain an information centre at Torside, open weekends and Bank Holidays from Easter to the end of October.
 
Longendale Trail Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Longendale - view of Torside Reservoir
0 - Longendale - view of Torside Reservoir
Woodhead reservoir
1 - Woodhead reservoir

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK068982


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
the western end of the trail is Hadfield station. From Glossop take the B6105 north and turn left after about 1km to Hadfield. If coming from the direction of Hyde on the A57, turn left at the roundabout just after crossing the River Etherow into Derbyshire. Torside centre lies along the B6105 Woodhead to Glossop road, overlooking Torside Reservoir.
When is it open?

Open all day all year. No restrictions.
What does it cost?

No charge for the visitor centre. Some of the car parks are pay and display.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

historic interest

 Melandra Roman Fort

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The ramparts of Melandra Castle
The ramparts of Melandra Castle
Melandra 'castle' is the only significant Roman relic visible in the Peak. A small garrison fort, it is situated on the western edge of Glossop with the Gamesley estate encroaching upon it from the south. The fort has been excavated by Manchester University and is a scheduled monument in the care of English Heritage. However, in modern times its major function seems to be as an exercise area for the estate's dogs.

The fort was built as a turf and wood construction around AD 78, when Agricola's troops overran northern England. It would have housed a cohort (500 men) of auxiliary soldiers and had a Principia (headquarters building), barracks and granaries. There is evidence that a vicum (civilian settlement) grew up nearby and a military bath-house has been found north-east of the fort. The name Melandra cannot be found in Roman records and the real name of the fort was probably Ardotalia.

The fort was rebuilt in stone around AD 120 in the time of Hadrian, but was abandoned only 20 years later. In the 18th century an inscribed stone was found which read 'First cohort of Frisiavonians the century of Valerius Vitalis' - this is assumed to be the soldiers who rebuilt the fort, the inscription indicating that they were Frisians from North Germany.

The fort's position is a good one, situated on a bluff overlooking the Etherow and commanding the route into the Longendale Valley. Archaeological research has indicated that this was probably just a part of a network of defences designed to control the east-west route over the Pennines. The visible remains are a disappointment though - all that can be seen is a low rampart enclosing a rectangular area of approximately 3 acres, with the foundations of the main buildings just visible in the centre.
 
Melandra Roman Fort Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge
Melandra Castle
0 - Melandra Castle

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK009951


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
From the centre of Glossop take the A57 towards Hyde, then at Dinting Vale turn left onto the A626 towards Marple. Go up the hill and after about 500 metres turn right, to follow the road which goes around the edge of the Gamesley council estate.

By Bus: The 392 bus from Glossop centre goes to Gamesley and passes Melandra Castle.

By Train: There are regular trains from Manchester to Glossop.
When is it open?

Open all year. There is a small car park adjacent.
What does it cost?

No charge.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

historic interestgood for exercisegood scenery

 New Mills Heritage Centre and Torrs Riverside Park

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The New Mills Heritage Centre stands on the corner of the main street of New Mills and above one of the paths leading down to The Torrs, a 30m deep sandstone gorge through which the River Goyt flows below the centre of the town.

The Heritage centre has displays on the history of New Mills, a model of the town as it was in 1884, and a shop selling guides and other publications. It also sells tea and coffee.

The Torrs Riverside Park offers spectacular views of the River Goyt and the gorge it has created, with interesting items of industrial archeology along the way. Carved through the sandstone at the end of the ice ages, the gorge was both a major transport barrier and a source of water power for local industry. At the bottom of the gorge is the old bridge across the river and soaring high above it is Union Road Bridge, built in 1884 to span the river at cliff-top level and standing 94 feet above the gorge.

Also in the gorge and along its sides are the remains of various mills which exploited the water power to drive their machinery. Torr Vale Mill stands on a bluff opposite the Heritage Centre and dates from the 1780s. It is now disused and crumbling, but operated as a textile mill until 2000 - the longest continuous cotton manufacturing in England.

Down in the gorge, the ruins of Torr Mill stand at the junction of the Sett and the Goyt - this burned down in 1912 and was not rebuilt. Next to it is the Torrs Hydro - a modern community owned hydroelectric scheme.

For walkers, the Torrs Riverside Park forms a link between the Goyt Way and the Sett Valley Trail and the Millenium Walkway was constructed in 1999-2000 to complete the link between these. 170m long, it is an elevated steel walkway above the River Goyt, allowing walkers to pass the section of river where the railway embankment abuts it. The project was funded with Lottery cash and won several awards. It's a spectacular piece of engineering.
 
New Mills Heritage Centre and Torrs Riverside Park Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
New Mills Torrs and Union Road Bridge
0 - New Mills Torrs and Union Road Bridge
New Mills Torrs - the Millenium Walkway
1 - New Mills Torrs - the Millenium Walkway
New Mills Torrs - Union Road Bridge and the Hydro
2 - New Mills Torrs - Union Road Bridge and the Hydro

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK000854


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How to get there

By Road:
Just off the main street through the centre of New Mills

By Bus: Regular buses to and from Stockport

By Train: The Heritage Centre is only a few yards from New Mills Central Station and less than 1km from New Mills Newtown station.
When is it open?

Heritage Centre open Tuesday - Sunday 10.30am - 4.30pm. Also open on Bank Holidays.The Torrs Riverside Park is open all day every day.
What does it cost?

Free

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

Website: http://www.newmillstowncouncil.org.uk/heritage.php

good for exercisegood scenery

 Sett Valley Trail


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The Sett Valley Trail is a cycle trail which follows the line of the former railway between Hayfield and New Mills. This branch line closed in the early 1970s and the line was purchased by Derbyshire County Council, who converted it into a cycling and walking route. It is a Pram and mobility scooter accessible walk.

The trail is approximately 4km long and winds it way along the bottom of the Sett Valley in magnificent scenery, but views are rather restricted by the number of trees growing alongside the trail.

Coming from Hayfield, the trail passes through the hamlets of Birch Vale and Thornsett before reaching New Mills. Once here, it is possible to continue via The Torrs Riverside Park to pick up the Goyt Way, which follows the River Goyt down to Marple and Compstall, a further 10km.
 

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK036869


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
The New Mills end is accessible from the long-stay car park in the centre of New Mills. The Hayfield end is at the old station, just off the A624 main road between Buxton and Glossop. There is a pay and display car park.

By Bus: Buses run from New Mills to Hayfield. There is a regular bus service from Stockport to New Mills.

By Train: New Mills Central station is only 400m from the start of the Trail. New Mills Newtown station is approximately 1km distant.
When is it open?

Open all day, all year
What does it cost?

Free

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

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