Hayfield: Tourist Attractions and Places to Visit in the Peak District - Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire

A directory of tourist and visitor attractions near Hayfield in the Peak District area of Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire and Yorkshire. Historic houses, churches, dams and reservoirs, theme parks, museums, railways and castles

Visitor Attractions around Hayfield

historic interest

 Bugsworth Canal Basin

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Bugsworth Canal Basin is the terminus of the Peak Forest Canal, which was constructed in 1794-9 to link this area with the canal network around Manchester. The purpose of the canal was to transport limestone and lime to industrial centres around the country, and alongside the canal a tramway was constructed from Dove Holes to Bugsworth to bring the stone down the the canal.

The canal prospered until the First World War and both it and the tramway closed in the 1920s, with rail and road taking the stone and lime traffic. Interest in the canal renewed in the 1960s and the main part of the canal re-opened in 1974. However, Bugsworth Canal Basin had to wait much longer for restoration and only re-opened in 2005.

The basin covers a large area and now usually has numerous narrow boats in it. Prior to 1900 it would have been a hum of activity, with several quays, cranes, limestone crushing facilities, lime kilns, a gauging station (where the boats' displacement was measured and the toll calculated), horse transfer bridges, a canal master's house and a pub. Some of this, like the gauging station, canal master's house and the pub (The Navigation) remain, and interpretation boards have been placed around the the basin to explain how the area looked and was used in the past. Other features, like the horse transfer bridges (built so that barges in the Middle and Upper Basins did not need to unhitch their horses), have been reconstructed.

There is a small exhibition in the Lower Basin, organised by the Inland Waterways Protection Society, who masterminded the restoration of the basin.
 
Bugsworth Canal Basin Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Bugsworth Canal Basin
0 - Bugsworth Canal Basin
Bugsworth Canal Basin
1 - Bugsworth Canal Basin
Bugsworth Canal Basin
2 - Bugsworth Canal Basin
Bugsworth - Navigation Inn
3 - Bugsworth - Navigation Inn

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK022821


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How to get there

By Road:
Access via the B6062 which leaves the A6 at Bridgemont and goes through Buxworth (note the recent re-spelling of Bugsworth) to Chinley

By Train: 2km from Chinley Station
When is it open?

Open all year, every day
What does it cost?

Not applicable

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

good for children

 Chestnut Centre, Chapel-en-le-Frith

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Otters at the Chestnut Centre
Otters at the Chestnut Centre


Visit this award-winning wildlife centre for a memorable and enjoyable day out. Watch the cheeky otters at play, including the endangered giant otter, and marvel at the 16 species of owls, Scottish wildcats, pine marten, polecats, foxes and deer, all in a stunning valley setting in the Peak District National Park.

Chat to our friendly and knowledgeable keepers during deer encounters, meet the keeper and animal feeding sessions and find out more about our amazing animals. With special events all year round, such as Utterly Otter Days, Pirate Polecats and Big BugHunt Bonanzas, its a fun-filled family adventure.

The Chestnut Centre lies off the A625 road between Chapel-en-le-Frith and Mam Tor. It is a good place to take children, and has is a tea-room and shop.


 
Chestnut Centre, Chapel-en-le-Frith Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge
Chestnut Centre otters
0 - Chestnut Centre otters

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK073822


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How to get there

By Road:
Turn off the Buxton-Manchester A6 road at Chapel-en-le-Frith, taking the A625 Castleton Road. The centre lies 2km along the road, on the left. From Sheffield, take the A6013 road to Castleton, go up the Winnats Pass, then turn right to follow the A625 towards Chapel-en-le-Frith.

By Bus: the 200 bus from Chapel-en-le-Frith to Castleton passes the Chestut Centre.
When is it open?

Open every day except December 25th and 26th between 10.30am and 5.30pm (closes 4.30 or dusk in winter). Last recommended entry 4.00pm in summer or 1 hour before sunset. (Open weekends only in January). Tel 01298 814099
What does it cost?

Adults £7.95 / Children (between 3 and 16 years) £5.95 / Family (2 adults and 2 children) £26.00 / Senior Citizens £6.75 / Disabled or special needs adult £6.75 / Disabled or special needs child £4.75 / Serving military personnel £6.75 (ID required). Designated carers free. Wheelchair users free - but difficult terrain!

Season Tickets available as are School Educational Visits - please enquire

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.chestnutcentre.co.uk/

historic interest

 Chinley New Chapel

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Chinley Chapel
Chinley Chapel
The Uniformity Act of 1662 compelled all clergy to give their consent to the liturgy of the Church of England and outlawed all other forms of religious worship. Clergy who were unable to agree to the rites of the Church of England were deprived of their parishes and forbidden to preach. Later Acts of Parliament forbade any religious gathering within 5 miles of a parish church and placed a limit on the number of people who could worship in private without using the Book of Common Prayer.

About 2000 ministers left the church about this time, including William Bagshawe, the vicar of Glossop and owner of Ford Hall near Chapel-en-le-Frith. Bagshawe was a famous local Nonconformist who held private services for many years at Ford Hall and later preached among many of the local villages. He was known as the 'Apostle of the Peak'.

Chinley Chapel interior
Chinley Chapel interior
The Act of Toleration in 1689 finally allowed Nonconformists to worship without persecution although bars to public office remained. Bagshawe and his friends converted a barn and held services there until Bagshawe's death in 1702. A dispute over the barn led to Bagshawe's successor, Dr James Clegg, to search for a more suitable place to worship, and in 1711 the 'New' Chapel was erected at a place now known as Chapel Milton.

The chapel is overshadowed externally by the enormous columns of the Midland Railway viaduct, but is a beautiful early 18th century building. The interior is simple and stark, in typical early Geogian style. One of the notable features is the gravestone of Grace Murray, a local woman who is said to be the only woman John Wesley ever loved. Though Wesley paid many visits to Chinley and often visited Grace and preached at the New Chapel, he never proposed to her and she eventually married one of his associates, a local preacher called John Bennet.
 
Chinley New Chapel Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Chinley Chapel
0 - Chinley Chapel
Chinley Chapel interior
1 - Chinley Chapel interior

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK055820


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How to get there

By Road:
the Chapel lies just off the A624 Chapel-en-le-Frith to Glossop road, at Chapel Milton. It is just below the railway viaduct - coming from Chapel there is a sharp (and slightly awkward) right turn immediately after the viaduct.

By Bus: the 189 bus from Buxton to Chinley goes via Town End, Chapel-en-le-Frith and passes the Chapel.

By Train: the train service from Manchester to Sheffield stops at Chinley station. From there it is a 3km walk to the Chapel.
When is it open?

Open regularly, especially Sundays.
What does it cost?

No charge.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

Website: http://www.chinleychapel.org.uk

historic interestgood for exercisegood scenery

 New Mills Heritage Centre and Torrs Riverside Park

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The New Mills Heritage Centre stands on the corner of the main street of New Mills and above one of the paths leading down to The Torrs, a 30m deep sandstone gorge through which the River Goyt flows below the centre of the town.

The Heritage centre has displays on the history of New Mills, a model of the town as it was in 1884, and a shop selling guides and other publications. It also sells tea and coffee.

The Torrs Riverside Park offers spectacular views of the River Goyt and the gorge it has created, with interesting items of industrial archeology along the way. Carved through the sandstone at the end of the ice ages, the gorge was both a major transport barrier and a source of water power for local industry. At the bottom of the gorge is the old bridge across the river and soaring high above it is Union Road Bridge, built in 1884 to span the river at cliff-top level and standing 94 feet above the gorge.

Also in the gorge and along its sides are the remains of various mills which exploited the water power to drive their machinery. Torr Vale Mill stands on a bluff opposite the Heritage Centre and dates from the 1780s. It is now disused and crumbling, but operated as a textile mill until 2000 - the longest continuous cotton manufacturing in England.

Down in the gorge, the ruins of Torr Mill stand at the junction of the Sett and the Goyt - this burned down in 1912 and was not rebuilt. Next to it is the Torrs Hydro - a modern community owned hydroelectric scheme.

For walkers, the Torrs Riverside Park forms a link between the Goyt Way and the Sett Valley Trail and the Millenium Walkway was constructed in 1999-2000 to complete the link between these. 170m long, it is an elevated steel walkway above the River Goyt, allowing walkers to pass the section of river where the railway embankment abuts it. The project was funded with Lottery cash and won several awards. It's a spectacular piece of engineering.
 
New Mills Heritage Centre and Torrs Riverside Park Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
New Mills Torrs and Union Road Bridge
0 - New Mills Torrs and Union Road Bridge
New Mills Torrs - the Millenium Walkway
1 - New Mills Torrs - the Millenium Walkway
New Mills Torrs - Union Road Bridge and the Hydro
2 - New Mills Torrs - Union Road Bridge and the Hydro

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK000854


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
Just off the main street through the centre of New Mills

By Bus: Regular buses to and from Stockport

By Train: The Heritage Centre is only a few yards from New Mills Central Station and less than 1km from New Mills Newtown station.
When is it open?

Heritage Centre open Tuesday - Sunday 10.30am - 4.30pm. Also open on Bank Holidays.The Torrs Riverside Park is open all day every day.
What does it cost?

Free

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

Website: http://www.newmillstowncouncil.org.uk/heritage.php

good for exercisegood scenery

 Sett Valley Trail


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The Sett Valley Trail is a cycle trail which follows the line of the former railway between Hayfield and New Mills. This branch line closed in the early 1970s and the line was purchased by Derbyshire County Council, who converted it into a cycling and walking route. It is a Pram and mobility scooter accessible walk.

The trail is approximately 4km long and winds it way along the bottom of the Sett Valley in magnificent scenery, but views are rather restricted by the number of trees growing alongside the trail.

Coming from Hayfield, the trail passes through the hamlets of Birch Vale and Thornsett before reaching New Mills. Once here, it is possible to continue via The Torrs Riverside Park to pick up the Goyt Way, which follows the River Goyt down to Marple and Compstall, a further 10km.
 

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK036869


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How to get there

By Road:
The New Mills end is accessible from the long-stay car park in the centre of New Mills. The Hayfield end is at the old station, just off the A624 main road between Buxton and Glossop. There is a pay and display car park.

By Bus: Buses run from New Mills to Hayfield. There is a regular bus service from Stockport to New Mills.

By Train: New Mills Central station is only 400m from the start of the Trail. New Mills Newtown station is approximately 1km distant.
When is it open?

Open all day, all year
What does it cost?

Free

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

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