Hope Valley: Tourist Attractions and Places to Visit in the Peak District - Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire

A directory of tourist and visitor attractions near Hope Valley in the Peak District area of Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire and Yorkshire. Historic houses, churches, dams and reservoirs, theme parks, museums, railways and castles

Visitor Attractions around Hope Valley

good for exercise

 Bagshaw Cavern


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Bagshawe Cavern is a largely natural cave system which was discovered by lead miners in 1806. It is open by arrangement for instructor-led 'Adventure caving for beginners', which gives access to a greater part of the cave for those who are prepared to get themselves dirty. A helmet, lamp and suitable clothing are necessary, for to see much of the cave system involves a certain amount of ladder-climbing and crawling, but some of the equipment can be hired at the cave.

The show cave descends 102 steps to a chamber and a horizontal passage, giving features called the Elephant's Throat and the Chandler's Shop. Beyond this is a passage of decorated flowstone called the Grotto of Paradise and a decorated chimney called Niagara Falls. There are some good stalagmites. The cave then divides into two parts - the lower section goes down a passage called the Dungeon and extends down close to a resurgence in Bradwell Dale, while the upper part leads to a chamber known as the Hippodrome.

References: Caves of Derbyshire by Trevor D Ford and David W Gill, Dalesman Books. Also: Underground Britain by Bruce Bedford, Collins/Willow.
 

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK172809


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How to get there

By Road:
the cave is situated up the hillside above the centre of Bradwell, on a small lane which leads to Bradwell Dale. Bradwell can be reached along the B6049 road from the A6013 road, which runs from Castleton to Sheffield. Approaching from the south, take the B6049 road from the A623 Chapel-en-le-frith to Chesterfield road, turning off near Tideswell.

By Bus: the 272 and 51A buses from Sheffield to Castleton pass through Bradwell. The 173 bus from Bakewell to Castleton also passes through Bradwell, and connects in Litton or Tideswell with the 66 bus from Buxton.
When is it open?

Details of opening times are obtainable from: Amanda Revell, email: amandarevell@hotmail.com


historic interestgood for childrengood scenery

 Blue John Mine


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The Castleton Caverns comprise The Blue John Cavern, Treak Cliff Cavern, Speedwell Cavern (all clustered around the Winnats pass) and the great Peak Cavern, just outside Castleton village.

The Blue John Cavern is at the top of the hill above Winnats Pass and is reached from Castleton either by walking up the hillside or by going up Winnats Pass and turning down the old Mam Tor road (now closed between the Blue John Mine and Treak Cliff). The cavern is open all year but opening times are restricted in January and February. Like Treak Cliff, the mine is part natural, part mine-workings, and contains natural chambers, veins of Blue John, fossils and stalactites and stalagmites. It descends a long series of steps to reach a large chamber known as Crystalised Cavern, which is followed by Lord Mulgrave's Dining-Room and the Variegated Cavern, all of which contain fine formations and interesting minerals.
 

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK132833


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How to get there

By Road:
take the minor road (formerly A625) from Chapel-en-le-Frith which leads to the foot of Mam Tor, as does the B6061, which leaves the A623 at Sparrowpit. From Bakewell take the B6001 to Calver and Grindleford and continue to Hathersage, where you turn left onto the A6187 up Hope Valley to Castleton. Continue up the Winnats Pass, then turn right at the top and right again down a dead end when the road turns left. From Sheffield, take the A625 to Fox House, then continue to Castleton on the A6187, and then as for Bakewell.

By Bus: the 200 bus from Chapel-en-le-Frith goes to Castleton via the Winnats Pass - alight at Mam Tor. From Sheffield take the 272 bus to Castleton and walk from the village or pick up the 200 bus up Winnats Pass. From Bakewell, take the 173 bus to Tideswell or Litton and there pick up the 174 Baslow-Castleton bus.
When is it open?

Open everyday except December 25th, 26th and New Years Day. Summer - from 9.30am to 5.30pm, Winter - from 10.00am to dusk.


What does it cost?

Adult £12.00/ Child £6.00/ Concessions £9.00/ Family (2 adult + 2 children) £32

Party rates on request: 01433 620638

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.bluejohn-cavern.co.uk

good for exercisegood scenery

 Derwent Dams

Slideshow
360 degree view
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The Upper Valley of the Derwent is a deep valley surrounded by gritstone edges and dominated by three great reservoirs, constructed by the Derwent Valley Water Board primarily to provide water for Sheffield, Derby, Nottingham and Leicester.

Derwent Dam
Derwent Dam
The upper two dams, Howden and Derwent, were constructed between 1901 and 1916 and they were such a large undertaking that a village called Birchinlee was constructed in the upper valley to house the workers and a narrow-gauge railway was built between Howden Dam and the Midland Railway at Bamford. Traces of both these may still be seen. The dams were opened in 1916.

In 1935 an even larger project began downstream of the two earlier dams - the construction of Ladybower Dam, which flooded the area around the junction of the Derwent with the Ashop. This project, first mooted in the early 1920s, caused considerable controversy because it involved the flooding of two villages; Ashopton - which lay at the junction of the Ashop and the Derwent - and Derwent, which lay upstream on the Derwent river.
View over Ladybower Reservoir
View over Ladybower Reservoir
Despite protests the dam went ahead and was finished in 1943, and opened by King George VI, though the reservoir took a further two years to fill. At the time this was the largest reservoir in Britain.

Now the only visible reminder of Derwent and Ashopton is the old packhorse bridge from Derwent village, which was dismantled and re-erected at Slippery Stones. Derwent village can still be seen in very dry summers such as 1959, 1976 and 1995, and the spire of the church was left standing until 1959, when it was demolished. The flooding of the two villages was the worst damage inflicted by the water authorities in their many projects around the Peak District, and highlighted the damage which these can do to the environment - though paradoxically Ladybower is now a major tourist attraction.

Another claim to fame for the Derwent reservoirs is their association with the 'Dambuster' squadron of the RAF, for they used the Derwent to practise for their famous raid on the Ruhr dams. Since then this event has been regularly commemorated in the Derwent valley with fly-pasts of old bombers and aerial displays. There is a small museum on this theme in the west tower of the Derwent Dam.

View down to Ladybower from Lockerbrook
View down to Ladybower from Lockerbrook
In recent years forestry has become an important factor here and much of the sides of the Upper Derwent valley have been clothed in conifers. This has made a considerable change to the look of the valley and altered the ecology. However the Forestry Commission are a relatively benevolent landowner who allow access and provide amenities for visitors.

This is a beautiful and popular area which acts as a magnet for visitors in fine weather, so at weekends the valley is full of walkers, cyclists, fell-runners and just plain tourists. To preserve the peace of the Upper Derwent the Peak National Park have closed the road beyond Fairholmes at weekends and a minibus service operates.
 
Derwent Dams Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Ladybower - View to Crook Hill
0 - Ladybower - View to Crook Hill
Ladybower from Win Hill
1 - Ladybower from Win Hill
Ladybower - Ashopton Viaduct and Bamford Edge
2 - Ladybower - Ashopton Viaduct and Bamford Edge
Ladybower from Whinstone Lee
3 - Ladybower from Whinstone Lee
Ladybower from Lockerbrook
4 - Ladybower from Lockerbrook
Ladybower from above Lockerbrook
5 - Ladybower from above Lockerbrook
Derwent Dam
6 - Derwent Dam
Derwent Dam overflowing
7 - Derwent Dam overflowing
Derwent Reservoir and Howden Dam
8 - Derwent Reservoir and Howden Dam
Derwent Dams - Howden reservoir
9 - Derwent Dams - Howden reservoir
Upper Derwent - Slippery Stones packhorse bridge
10 - Upper Derwent - Slippery Stones packhorse bridge
Derwent Valley - Howden Dam
11 - Derwent Valley - Howden Dam

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK202860


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How to get there

By Road:
the A57 Glossop to Sheffield road crosses Ladybower by the Ashopton viaduct. A minor road on the west side of this leads to Fairholmes. Approaching from Hope Valley, follow the A6013 north from Bamford to reach Ladybower and the A57.

By Bus: the 273 bus from Sheffield to Castleton goes to Fairholmes Information Centre. The 273 Sheffield (or Chesterfield) to Castleton bus stops at the Ladybower Inn alongside Ladybower Reservoir.
When is it open?

There is a Forestry Commission information centre and car-park at Fairholmes, just below Derwent Dam, run in cooperation with the Peak National Park. (Open daily Easter - end October and winter weekends. Telephone 01433 650953). The centre also offers bicycle hire (tel: 01433 651261), toilets and refreshments.
What does it cost?

Access is free, but many of the car parks are pay and display.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.stwater.co.uk/leisure-and-learning/reservoir-locations/upper-derwent-water/

historic interest

 Hathersage Church

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Hathersage Church
Hathersage Church
Hathersage church stands on a knoll above the present village, close to the remains of an ancient Danish settlement. The structure of the current Hathersage church was begun in 1381 but there had been churches on this site since at least 200 years before that and the list of vicars of Hathersage goes back to 1281. Traces of an Early English building can be seen at the pillars on the North side of the nave. Most of the present structure dates from the 15th century, when the church was extended by the local squires, the Eyre family of Padley.

In the sanctuary of the church are several notable brasses on the tombs of members of the Eyre family. The best known is the altar tomb of Robert Eyre (died 1459), who fought at Agincourt and built much of the present church, with brasses of him and his wife Joan and of their fourteen children. Above this are brasses of his eldest surviving son (also Robert Eyre, died c. 1500), his wife Elizabeth and four of their sons.

Eyre brassrubbing
Eyre brassrubbing
On the other side of the sanctuary there are fine brasses of Ralph Eyre of Offerton Hall (the sixth son of the first Robert Eyre, died 1493) and his wife Elizabeth and of Sir Arthur Eyre of Padley (a grandson of the second Robert Eyre) and his first wife Margaret (died about 1560). Though it is not possible to enter the sanctuary, copies of the brasses are held in the vestry, with rubbing materials, and it is possible to take rubbings of them for a small fee.

However, the main attraction of Hathersage church is undoubtedly the grave of Little John which lies under a yew tree to the south of the church. Tradition has it that Little John was a Hathersage man and that he died in a small cottage near the church, pulled down in the 19th century.

What is certain is that a very tall man is buried here, for the grave was opened in 1782 and the skeleton of a man about 7 feet tall was discovered. For many years an ancient longbow and cap hung in the church, but these were removed in the early 19th century. The current grave enclosure is impressive for its length, but there is little of substance to see.
 
Hathersage Church Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Hathersage Church
0 - Hathersage Church
Hathersage Church - Eyre family brass rubbing
1 - Hathersage Church - Eyre family brass rubbing

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK233819


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How to get there

By Road:
take the A625 road from Sheffield to Fox House, then follow the A6013 to Hathersage. As you enter the village, take the narrow road on the right which leads to Stanage Edge, pass the primary school and then fork left. Parking near the church is rather problematic.

By Bus: the 272 bus from Sheffield goes to the centre of Hathersage. From here it is a 400m walk to the church.

By Train: Hathersage station lies on the southern edge of the village, almost 1km walk from the church. Regular trains go from here to Sheffield and Manchester.
When is it open?

Normally open in daytime.
What does it cost?

No charge.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

historic interestgood for exercisegood scenery

 Mam Tor

Slideshow
360 degree view
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Mam Tor view to Lose Hill
Mam Tor view to Lose Hill
Mam Tor from the former Odin Mine
Mam Tor from the former Odin Mine
Mam Tor is a famous viewpoint and landmark, rearing up above the valleys of Hope and Edale. Known as the 'shivering mountain', it is comprised of shale and the East face is a dramatic and loose expanse of crumbling rock. The area below the face is constantly on the move and each period of heavy rain undermines the loose shale and causes it to slip further down the valley. The former A625 main road from Stockport to Sheffield once went down this way but was swept away by a landslide in 1974 and has not been rebuilt.

On the top of the hill was a large Iron Age fort, and the fortifications can still be seen. However, the site was almost certainly occupied long before this. The trig point on the summit of the hill is placed on top of a tumulus which probably dates from the Bronze Age, and a bronze axehead has also been found here. Unfortunately the tumulus is now hard to make out because erosion has forced the National Trust, who own the hill and the nearby Winnats Pass, to pave the summit area.

Mam Tor ramparts and view to Edale
Mam Tor ramparts and view to Edale
The ramparts can be followed most of the way around the hilltop, and there are clear remains of two gateways on the paths leading from Mam Nick and from Hollins Cross. Excavations have shown that the original ramparts had a timber pallisade on top, but later the timber was replaced by stone. There are also the foundations of many hut circles within the defences and pottery has also been found, which indicates that this was a fully-fledged village rather than just a defensive site.

Mam Tor summit view to Kinder
Mam Tor summit view to Kinder
The views from the summit of Mam Tor are superb, with a fine view of Edale and Kinder to the north and Hope valley to the east, and a splendid ridge leading from the summit down to Hollins Cross and along to Lose Hill. Mam Tor looks particularly impressive when approached across the limestone moors from the direction of Peak Forest.

The escarpments around Mam Tor and nearby Lord's Seat and Rushup Edge seem to attract winds at all times and this has led to it becoming the most popular local centre for hang-gliding and paragliding.
 
Mam Tor Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Mam Tor summit looking down to Lose Hill
0 - Mam Tor summit looking down to Lose Hill
Mam Tor Iron Age ramparts and the view across Edale
1 - Mam Tor Iron Age ramparts and the view across Edale
Mine workings outside the Odin Mine Castleton
2 - Mine workings outside the Odin Mine Castleton
Mam Tor summit with Kinder Scout behind
3 - Mam Tor summit with Kinder Scout behind
Mam Tor view in temperature inversion
4 - Mam Tor view in temperature inversion
Mam Tor view to Lose Hill
5 - Mam Tor view to Lose Hill
Winnats Pass from Mam Tor
6 - Winnats Pass from Mam Tor

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK127836


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How to get there

By Road:
the minor road (formerly A625) from Chapel-en-le-Frith leads to the foot of Mam Tor, as does the B6061, which leaves the A623 at Sparrowpit. From Bakewell, take the B60012 to Calver and Grindleford and continue to Hathersage. Turn left to follow the A6187 up Hope Valley to Castleton, and continue up the Winnats Pass, then turn right at the top. There is a car park below Mam Nick. From Shefflield, take the A625 to Fox House and then the A6187 to Castleton, and then as for Bakewell.

By Bus: the 200 bus from Chapel-en-le-Frith goes to Castleton via the Winnats Pass - alight at Mam Tor. From Sheffield take the 272 bus to Castleton and walk from the village or pick up the 200 bus up Winnats Pass. From Bakewell, take the 173 bus to Tideswell or Litton and there pick up the 174 Baslow-Castleton bus.

By Train: take the Manchester-Sheffield train to Edale station and walk up the hill, an energetic (and uphill) but enjoyable walk of about 3km.




When is it open?

National Trust access land.


historic interestgood for childrengood scenery

 Peak Cavern

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Peak Cavern lies below Peveril Castle
Peak Cavern lies below Peveril Castle
The Castleton Caverns comprise The Blue John Cavern, Treak Cliff Cavern, Speedwell Cavern (all clustered around the Winnats pass) and the great Peak Cavern, just outside Castleton village.

Peak Cavern is the only wholly natural cavern of the four and is the least commercialised. It is owned by the Duchy of Lancaster but now managed by the owners of Speedwell Cavern. It was known to locals as the Devil's Arse and the stream issuing from it as the Styx, which give some idea of the mixed feelings the local people had about this natural wonder.

The approach and entry are very impressive, taking you into an immense cleft in the rock below the crag on top of which sits Peveril Castle and into a wide and spacious cave entrance which was used by ropemakers until the middle years of the 20th century and once accommodated several small ropemakers' cottages, which were demolished in the early 20th century.

Entrance to Peak Cavern
Entrance to Peak Cavern
Beyond the entrance a narrow passage leads to a chamber called the Bell-House. Continuing on along the path (at one time visitors were taken by punt along this part) you reach a chamber called the Great Cave which is about 60m high and contains a passage in its roof which emerges near Peveril Castle.

At the far end of this chamber a passage leads through to Orchestral Chamber, where village maidens used to sing to distinguished visitors, such as Queen Victoria. Further on is Pluto's Dining Room and the Devil's Staircase and an area called the Five Arches, which is as far as the standard tour goes.

For potholers it is possible to go much further into the cave system, which extends for miles, and at selected times in winter the cavern is open to them.

Further reading: Underground Britain by Bruce Bedford, Collins/Willow; Caves of Derbyshire by Trevor D Ford and David D Gill, Dalesman Books.
 
Peak Cavern Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Castleton - Peak Cavern entrance with Peveril castle above
0 - Castleton - Peak Cavern entrance with Peveril castle above
Castleton - the entrance to Peak Cavern
1 - Castleton - the entrance to Peak Cavern
Castleton - looking down from above Peak Cavern entrance
2 - Castleton - looking down from above Peak Cavern entrance

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK148828


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How to get there

By Road:
from the A6 Manchester-Buxton road at Chapel-en-le-Frith branch off on the minor road (formerly A625) to Mam Tor, and from there take the steep narrow road down Winnats Pass to reach Castleton. Peak Cavern is on the right as you reach the village. From the A6 at Bakewell take the A622 to Calver and Grindleford, then fork left to follow the River Derwent to Hathersage, where you turn left again and follow the A6187 to Castleton. Peak Cavern is through the other side of the village. From Shefffield, take the A625 to Fox House, continue to Hathersage and then pick up the A6187 as above.

By Bus: the 200 bus from Chapel-en-le-Frith goes to Castleton via the Winnats Pass. From Sheffield take the 272 bus to Castleton. From Bakewell, take the 173 bus to Tideswell or Litton and there pick up the 174 Baslow-Castleton bus.

By Train: trains from Manchester to Sheffield stop at Hope Station, about 4km from the cavern. Either walk from there or pick up one of the buses mentioned.
When is it open?

April to October - every day, 10.00am to 5.00pm, November to March - weekends only 10.00am to 5.00pm. Last Tour is 45 mins before closing.
What does it cost?

Adult £10.25/ Child (5-15 years) £8.25/ Concessions £9.75/ Family (2 adults + 2 children) £33.00/ Additional Child £7.00. Combined tickets for Peak Cavern and Speedwell Cavern are available at a discounted price.

Party Rates for school parties are available - please enquire: 01433 620285

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.peakcavern.co.uk/category/general/

historic interestgood for childrengood for exercisegood scenery

 Peveril Castle

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Peveril Castle and Mam Tor
Peveril Castle and Mam Tor
Peveril Castle stands in an impregnable position on a clifftop above Castleton, flanked by the steep side of Cavedale. It is an evocative place, with an impressive view in all directions and sufficient ruined remains to construct a good idea of how the castle looked in its heyday. The castle bears the name of William Peveril, who was granted the title of bailiff of the Royal Manors of the Peak - in effect the King's agent for the Royal Forest of the Peak - after the Norman conquest of 1066. Peveril is thought to have been an illegitimate son of William I.

Peveril created Castleton and in 1080 he fortified the site of the present castle and constructed a wooden keep. Later, these buildings were converted into stone. However, Peveril's son (also called William) became too independent for Henry II, and in 1155 the King confiscated the Peveril estates and the castle has belonged to the Crown or the Duchy of Lancaster ever since.

Henry visited Castleton several times, to hunt and, on one occasion, to meet King Malcolm of Scotland, who paid homage to Henry here in 1157. The court records show that an enormous amount of wine was consumed on this occasion!

The castle fell into disuse after Tudor times, and by the 17th century only the keep was in use - as a courthouse. When this was abandoned the castle gradually became ruined until what remained was restored this century.

You enter the castle up a very steep climb from Castleton, but this was not the original main approach, which went up Goosehill and zig-zagged up the hill to approach along the ridge above Cavedale which reaches towards the keep. Peveril dug a breach in this ridge to create a moat which had a wooden bridge across it. Sadly, this bridge has gone and not been replaced.

Peveril Castle keep
Peveril Castle keep
The Castleton entrance leads in through the remains of a gatehouse which was built in the 12th century and into the main courtyard of the castle. Around this is the remains of a curtain wall, which was constructed in early Norman times by the Peverils, and includes Roman tiles which presumably were taken from the ruins of the Roman fort at Navio (Brough).

Dominating the site are the remains of the keep, which was built by Henry II in 1176 and is relatively well preserved. The keep was originally about 60 feet high and was faced with fine gritstone blocks, which still remain on the east and south sides. It dominates the view across both Castleton and Cavedale below. Inside the courtyard it is possible to trace the foundations of a Great Hall and kitchens and other buildings, but it is the view across the surrounding countryside which is the finest feature of the visit.

The castle is now in the care of English Heritage.

An excellent short walk around the castle is to go up Cavedale from the centre of Castleton. When the dale begins to level out towards the top, cut up to the right to reach a path coming back along the top of the ridge. This approaches Peveril Castle from the west, and then descends to Goosehill via the original approach route mentioned above.
 
Peveril Castle Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Peveril Castle from Cave Dale
0 - Peveril Castle from Cave Dale
Peveril Castle keep
1 - Peveril Castle keep
Peveril Castle view to Mam Tor
2 - Peveril Castle view to Mam Tor
Castleton - looking up Cave Dale
3 - Castleton - looking up Cave Dale
Castleton - looking down from above Peak Cavern entrance
4 - Castleton - looking down from above Peak Cavern entrance

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK149827


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How to get there

By Road:
the A625 road branches off the Manchester-Buxton A6 road at Chapel-en-le-Frith. Below Mam Tor (where the A625 ends because the road collapsed) turn down the steep and narrow Winnats Pass road to get to Castleton. From Sheffield take the A625 to Fox House and the A6187 to Hathersage and Castleton.

By Bus: the 173 bus from Bakewell to Castleton. From Buxton, the 66 bus connects with the 173 at Tideswell, as does the X67 from Chesterfield. The 272 bus runs from Sheffield to Castleton.

By Train: regular trains run from Manchester to Sheffield, stopping at Hope Station, about 4km from Castleton. From here, a pleasant walk, or pick up the 173 bus above.
When is it open?

From 25th March to 30th September: open daily 10am - 6pm

From 1st October to 31st October: open daily 10am - 5pm

From 1st November to February 12th 2017: open weekends 10am-4pm

From 13th February - 17th February: open daily 10am - 4pm

From 18th February to 31st March: weekends only 10am - 4pm

Closed 24-26 December & 31 December & 1 January
What does it cost?

Adults £5.70, Children £3.4, Concessions £5.10, English Heritage Members Free, Family ticket: £14.80

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/peveril-castle/

historic interestgood for childrengood scenery

 Speedwell Cavern

Slideshow

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The Castleton Caverns comprise The Blue John Cavern, Treak Cliff Cavern, Speedwell Cavern (all clustered around the Winnats pass) and the great Peak Cavern, just outside Castleton village.

Speedwell Cavern, at the very foot of Winnats Pass, is probably the most popular cavern of the four. This is a mine with several natural chambers and an underground canal which forms the centrepiece of the visit. The cavern is open daily all year.

Steps lead down from the entrance to the canal, which was hacked through the rock by miners in search of lead in the 1770s. The project was led by James Gilbert who was the Duke of Devonshire's agent for the Ecton Hill mines and made a fortune there, but at Speedwell eleven years of digging brought little reward before the venture closed. The water in the canal has already followed a tortuous underground passage from Perryfoot, near Sparrowpit, and eventually emerges at Russet Well, just near the entrance to Peak Cavern.

At the end of the canal is the Bottomless Pit, a large water-filled hole. This huge natural cavern is so high you cannot see the top and is so deep that when the canal was dug many tons of waste rock were tipped into it without making any visible impression upon it.


 
Speedwell Cavern Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge
Winnats Pass
0 - Winnats Pass

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK142828


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How to get there

By Road:
from the A6 Manchester-Buxton road at Chapel-en-le-Frith branch off on the minor road (formerly A625) to Mam Tor, and from there take the steep narrow road down Winnats Pass to reach Castleton. Speedwell Cavern is at the foot of Winnats Pass. From the A6 at Bakewell take the B6001 to Calver and Grindleford, then fork left to follow the River Derwent to Hathersage, where you turn left again and follow the A6187 to Castleton. Speedwell Cavern is through the other side of the village and a short walk is necessary. From Sheffield, take the A621 to Fox House, continue to Hathersage and then pick up the A6013 as above.

By Bus: the 200 bus from Chapel-en-le-Frith goes to Castleton via the Winnats Pass. From Sheffield take the 272 bus to Castleton and walk from the village. From Bakewell, take the 173 bus to Tideswell or Litton and there pick up the 174 Baslow-Castleton bus.
When is it open?

April to October open daily from 10.00am to 5.00pm, and November to March open daily from 10.00am to 4.00pm. Closed on Xmas Day. Last Tour is 1 hour before closing time.
What does it cost?

Adult £11.00/ Child (5-15yrs) £9.00/ concessions £10.00/ Family ticket (2 adults + 2 children) £36.00 (Additional child £7.75). Combined tickets are available for Speedwell and Peak Caverns at a discount.

Party rates for school parties are available - please enquire: 01433 623018

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://speedwellcavern.co.uk/category/general/

good for exercisegood scenery

 Stanage Edge

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Stanage Edge from the road
Stanage Edge from the road
Stanage is the largest and most impressive of the gritstone edges. Situated on the moors north of Hathersage, and visible from miles away down in the Hope Valley, it stretches for a length of approximately six kilometres (3.5 miles) from its northern tip at Stanage End to the southern point near the Cowper Stone. At about is mid-point the edge is crossed by Long Causeway, the old Roman road from Navio (Brough) to Doncaster. It is a famous location for rock-climbing and a popular spot for walkers.

High Neb, Stanage
High Neb, Stanage
Stanage's situation is high and it can be snowbound in winter. For most of its length it lies between the 400 and 450 metre contours, and the rock face itself attains a maximum height of 25 metres, but for most of its length it is between 15 and 20 metres high. The high point of the main edge is at High Neb, which lies near the north end.

Goliaths Groove, Stanage
Goliaths Groove, Stanage
The edge is made of one of the finer gritstones and is therefore ideal for rock-climbing, and the visitor on a summer weekend will see plenty of evidence of this. The climbers have given the sections of the edge colourful, sometimes fanciful names - Marble Wall, Crow Chin, Goliath's Groove, The Tower, The Unconquerables, Mississippi Buttress, Robin Hood's Cave, Black Hawk, Flying Buttress area etc - and the edge currently has over 800 recorded rock climbs with more being invented every year.

Looking south down Stanage Edge
Looking south down Stanage Edge
It now seems quite far-fetched to record that at one time this was a private grouse moor to which access was forbidden and the early pioneers of rock-climbing were forced to make furtive visits or bribe the gamekeepers with barrels of beer. Despite this, climbs were made here as early as the 1890s by pioneers such as JW Puttrell, joined in the early years of this century by Henry Bishop. For ten years from 1915 a small group led by Henry Kelly and Ivar Berg visited the edge to make numerous climbs. This continued through the 1930s, despite the activities of the gamekeepers.

View north from Robin Hoods Cave
View north from Robin Hoods Cave
However, after the second world war the floodgates opened as access got easier and more climbers visited the edge. This began with Peter Harding's ascent of Goliath's Groove in 1947 and gathered pace in the 50's with the appearance of legendary figures such as Joe Brown and later, Don Whillans. Climbing standards made a great leap forward, and the sport gained more adherents, leading to its present popularity.

Stanage is now suffering from its popularity. The edge, which once had heather and bracken to its foot and heather in many of the cracks, has had much of its vegetation worn away with erosion occurring around it, and many of the more popular climbs are becoming quite polished through the ascent of many climbers.
 
Stanage Edge Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Stanage Edge
0 - Stanage Edge
Stanage Edge - High Neb
1 - Stanage Edge - High Neb
Stanage Edge - Climbing near the north end
2 - Stanage Edge - Climbing near the north end
Stanage Edge in snow
3 - Stanage Edge in snow
Stanage Edge in autumn/winter colours
4 - Stanage Edge in autumn/winter colours
Stanage Edge - Robin Hoods Cave
5 - Stanage Edge - Robin Hoods Cave
Stanage Edge - Striding out along the edge
6 - Stanage Edge - Striding out along the edge
Stanage Edge - Walker and dog taking in the view
7 - Stanage Edge - Walker and dog taking in the view
Stanage Edge - South end
8 - Stanage Edge - South end
Stanage Edge - Air ambulance taking off
9 - Stanage Edge - Air ambulance taking off

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK245829


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How to get there

By Road:
the south (and most popular) end of Stanage Edge lies alongside a minor road which runs from Eccleshall in Sheffield via Ringinglow to Hathersage. There is free parking, but at weekends this quickly fills up. The north end lies a 2km walk from the A57 Glossop - Sheffield road at Moscar Top (parking slightly difficult).

By Bus: The 257 bus from Sheffield to Derwent, via Hathersage, passes the south end of Stanage Edge but only operates on summer weekends and Bank Holidays. The 273 Sheffield to Castleton bus or 275 Sheffield to Hathersage passes the north end of Stanage Edge at Moscar Top, but that's the less interesting end of the edge. The other alternative is to take the 271/2 Sheffield to Hathersage bus and alight at Fox House, then walk up the valley below Burbage Edge and turn left at the top to arrive at Stanage - about 30 minutes but a very pleasant walk.

By Train: train from Manchester or Sheffield to Hathersage - then walk (5km) or pick up the 257 bus.
When is it open?

Access land. Open all year, all day.


historic interestgood for children

 Treak Cliff Cavern


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The Castleton Caverns comprise The Blue John Cavern, Treak Cliff Cavern, Speedwell Cavern (all clustered around the Winnats pass) and the great Peak Cavern, just outside Castleton village.

Treak Cliff cavern is higher up the old Mam Tor road and contains a range of nice stalactite and stalagmite formations. It is open all year. The cave was originally a mine, dug mainly to mine Blue John, which is still mined here. The initial sections of the cave pass through the old mine workings and veins of Blue John (which is a fluorspar discoloured by blue and yellow impurities, much used for jewellery) can clearly be seen in the walls. In 1926 the miners broke through into natural caverns beyond, and these have some fine natural formations, which have been christened by names such as the Frozen Waterfall and Alladin's Cave.


 

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK137832


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
from the A6 Manchester-Buxton road at Chapel-en-le-Frith branch off on the minor road (formerly A625) to Mam Tor, and from there take the steep narrow road down Winnats Pass to reach Castleton. Treak Cliff Cavern is on the left as you reach the major road at the foot of Winnats Pass. From the A6 at Bakewell take the B6001 to Calver and Grindleford, then fork left to follow the River Derwent to Hathersage, where you turn left again and follow the A6187 to Castleton. Treak Cliff Cavern is 1km out through the other side of the village. From Shefffield, take the A621 to Fox House, continue to Hathersage and then pick up the A6187 as above.

By Bus: the 200 bus from Chapel-en-le-Frith goes to Castleton via the Winnats Pass - alight at the foot of the pass. From Sheffield take the 272 bus to Castleton and walk from the village. From Bakewell, take the 173 bus to Tideswell or Litton and there pick up the 174 Baslow-Castleton bus.
When is it open?

Open daily from March to October 10.00am to 4.20pm and from November - February from 10.00 to 3.20pm. Closed December 25th and 26th.


What does it cost?

Adult £9.75/ Child £5.20/ Family Ticket £26.50/ Concession £8.75

For Group Rates please call 01433 620571.

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary. See this link for more information on prices and opening

Website: http://www.bluejohnstone.com

good for exercisegood scenery

 Winnats Pass

Slideshow

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Winnats Pass
Winnats Pass
Winnats Pass, Castleton, is a long collapsed limestone cave system. The name Winnats is short for 'Windygates' and on a windy day you will see why it came by that name, for the wind seems to swirl around everywhere.

The 'pass' part of the name is something of a misnomer - Winnats is a steep-sided limestone valley with cliffs on all sides, which climbs out of the Hope Valley onto the limestone plateau area above. The valley was created by the action of water eating away at the limestone rock - water gradually dissolves the limestone and the streams tend to find their way underground by gradually enlarging the natural cracks and fissures in the rock.

View of Winnats Pass
View of Winnats Pass
There are numerous underground stream systems in this area and one of these created a large cave system beneath the edge of the cliff overlooking Castleton. Eventually the rock underground was worn away until the whole cave system collapsed, leaving the steep-sided valley you can see now.

The sides of the valley contain a number of known pot-holes and Speedwell Cavern (one of the area's many show caves) has its entrance at the foot of Winnats Pass.

There are numerous footpaths around Winnats Pass and a short walk up the pass and down by another route is recommended.
 
Winnats Pass Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Winnats Pass
0 - Winnats Pass
Winnats Pass view
1 - Winnats Pass view
Winnats Pass from Mam Tor
2 - Winnats Pass from Mam Tor

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK136826


See location on Streetmap.co.uk



How to get there

By Road:
from the A6 Manchester-Buxton road at Chapel-en-le-Frith branch off on the minor road (formerly A625) to Mam Tor. Either park there and walk down or take the steep narrow road down Winnats Pass to reach Castleton. From the A6 at Bakewell take the B6001 to Calver and Grindleford, then fork left to follow the River Derwent to Hathersage, where you turn left again and follow the A6187 to Castleton. Winnats Pass is through the other side of the village and a short walk is necessary. From Shefffield, take the A621 to Fox House, continue to Hathersage and then pick up the A6187 as above.

By Bus: the 200 bus from Chapel-en-le-Frith goes to Castleton via the Winnats Pass. From Sheffield take the 272 bus to Castleton and walk from the village. From Bakewell, take the 173 bus to Tideswell or Litton and there pick up the 174 Baslow-Castleton bus.
When is it open?

National Trust access land. No restrictions.


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