Stanton Moor

historic interestopportunities for exercisespectacular scenery

Stanton Moor is in a fine position overlooking both the Derwent and Wye valleys. Possibly it is for this reason that it was chosen as a centre by the Bronze Age inhabitants of the area, who have left so many traces of their occupation upon the moor.

Nine Ladies stone circle
Nine Ladies stone circle
The moor contains at least 70 barrows as well as stone circles, ancient enclosures and standing stones and is of such interest to archaeologists that the whole area is now protected. However, don't go expecting anything on the scale of Stonehenge, or even Arbor Low - most of the monuments and remains are very small-scale and overgrown with heather.

The Cork Stone
The Cork Stone
The best known monument is the Nine Ladies Stone Circle, which lies at the centre of the moor - a low circle of worn gritstone blocks in a lovely location. Just to the south is a small standing stone - the King's Stone - and these are probably only a small part of what was once some sort of ceremonial area.

Most of the other famous stones around the moor are natural in origin - the Cat Stone, Cork Stone and Andle or Aingle Stone (which lies down to the west, below the moor) - but this has not prevented colourful legends accumulating about their origins or uses - mostly linking them with Druids, despite a complete lack of archaeological evidence.

The eastern edge of the moor is now owned by the National Trust, and includes a strange square gritstone tower which was raised as a monument to commemorate the first Great Reform Act of 1832.


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Stanton Moor Photo Gallery - click on the images to enlarge- Click Here for a slide show
Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
0 - Stanton Moor - the 9 ladies stone circle
Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
1 - Stanton Moor - Cork Stone
Stanton Moor - the Andle Stone with Youlgrave behind
2 - Stanton Moor - the Andle Stone with Youlgrave behind

Ordnance Survey Grid Reference: SK249634

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How to get there

By Road:
turn off the A6 between Bakewell and Rowsley onto the B5056 Ashbourne road and turn left where the road to Youlgrave forks off right. About 500m further on, turn left again, to Stanton in Peak. Follow the road through the village and take the second turn left to get onto the moor.

By Bus: the 172 bus runs from Bakewell to Stanton in Peak. From the village it is a brisk 1km (mostly uphill) walk onto the moor.
When is it open?

The moor is access land and there are no charges or restrictions.
What does it cost?

No charge

Prices and opening times are shown as a guideline only and may vary.

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